pszsvrpjk

Simone Biles flips over to new Athleta partnership, ends Nike deal

first_img Beau Lund FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailAthleta(NEW YORK) — Simone Biles and Athleta have entered into a new partnership.The Gap Inc.-owned activewear company announced on Friday that the superstar gymnast will be the face of its brand.Together, the brand and Biles, plan to expand the mission of fostering community, igniting activity and inspiring the next generation to be the best version of themselves, the company said.In her role with Athleta, she will collaborate with the design team to develop signature products.“Using my voice has been very empowering for me and I am grateful to embark on this new journey with Athleta to inspire young girls and women to do the same,” said Biles in a statement.“The opportunity to encourage young girls to reach their full potential and be a force for change is incredibly powerful. I admire Athleta for their commitment to recognize and support women’s individual and collective strength and, together, I believe we can help girls to confidently and passionately take on the world in their athletic endeavors and beyond,” she added.Before her partnership with Athleta, Biles was a brand ambassador with Nike since 2015The gymnast discussed what attracted her to Athleta to The Wall Street Journal saying, “I felt like it wasn’t just about my achievements, it’s what I stood for and how they were going to help me use my voice and also be a voice for females and kids.”Biles added, “I feel like they also support me, not just as an athlete, but just as an individual outside of the gym and the change that I want to create, which is so refreshing.”A Nike spokesperson said that “Simone Biles is an incredible athlete and we wish her the very best” and, “we will continue to champion, celebrate and evolve to support our female athletes.”As an Athleta partner, Biles is being given the platform to inspire “honest conversations” and play a role in developing programming focused on supporting and uplifting young women.“Simone embodies our brand through her advocacy, mentorship and work in the community,” said Jana Henning, chief product officer of Athleta in a statement. “Our team is looking forward to working collaboratively with her to bring the same elements of confidence, strength, and grace she demonstrates on and off the mat into future collections for girls.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Written bycenter_img April 23, 2021 /Sports News – National Simone Biles flips over to new Athleta partnership, ends Nike deallast_img read more

Naval Air Station Whidbey Island Remembers Pearl Harbor

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Naval Air Station Whidbey Island Remembers Pearl Harbor Naval Air Station Whidbey Island Remembers Pearl Harbor Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI), Electronic Attack Squadron 129 (VAQ-129), the Pearl Harbor Survivors’ Association, and North Cascades Chapter 5 honored those killed at Pearl Harbor 72 years ago during a commemoration ceremony, Dec. 6.VAQ-129 hosted the Pearl Harbor Day Commemoration Ceremony at the PBY Memorial Foundation and Navy Heritage Center on the NASWI Seaplane Base, in remembrance of the attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941.Capt. Michael Nortier, NASWI commanding officer, said NASWI was honored to have the survivors at the ceremony.“We have just a few of the brave souls here today that defended our nation,” Nortier said. “In Pearl Harbor they were like today’s Sailors; we have the finest men and women deployed defending our nation.”At the time of the attack Calavan was on the former battleship USS Utah (BB-31). It was the first ship attacked by the Japanese and the wreckage is still visible in the harbor.“What made me angry is the Japanese knew we were there and their torpedoes sank us within 15 minutes,” Calavan said. “We weren’t prepared; over 2,000 young men died that day and it’s because we weren’t alert and ready. We can’t let that happen again.”National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, which is observed annually on Dec. 7, is to remember and honor all those who died in the attack on Pearl Harbor.“I was laying in a ditch,” Calavan said. “One of the nicest things about being 17 was I didn’t realize the great danger I was in from being in a ditch. I just knew I was scared.”Calavan said that the day after the attack they had to pull the bodies out of the water. Most of the bodies had no identification and they had to cut their jaws out of their mouth to identify the bodies.“I grew up a little that day,” Calavan said. “The next day I really grew up.”Gayle Vyskocil, a member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors’ Association, laid a wreath outside the base of the USS Arizona memorial. The wreath honored the 2,403 Navy, Marine Corps, Army and civilian men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to their country. Sailors and attendees also laid carnations over the wreath showing their respect.[mappress]Press Release, December 09, 2013; Image: Wikimedia Training & Educationcenter_img Share this article December 9, 2013last_img read more

Malaysia: Boustead Naval Shipyard Awards USD 9.6 Mln Job to Boustead Atlas

first_img View post tag: Atlas View post tag: Mln View post tag: Job View post tag: Navy Malaysian-based Boustead Atlas Hall has signed a RM26.6m (about USD 9.6 million) contract with Boustead Naval Shipyard, under which Boustead Atlas Hall will construct a hangar and consolidate two vessels, according to the The Star Online. January 30, 2014 View post tag: Defence View post tag: Defense View post tag: Naval View post tag: Malaysia View post tag: 9 View post tag: 6center_img Malaysia: Boustead Naval Shipyard Awards USD 9.6 Mln Job to Boustead Atlas View post tag: USD View post tag: awards Back to overview,Home naval-today Malaysia: Boustead Naval Shipyard Awards USD 9.6 Mln Job to Boustead Atlas View post tag: News by topic Both companies are subsidiaries of the Boustead Holdings Bhd, which owns 68.85% of Bousted Naval Shipyard.These contracts were deemed related party transaction under the Listing Requirements of Bursa Malaysia Securities Bhd and the awarded works are in the best interest of the Boustead Holdings, the parent company said.Boustead Naval Shipyard covers an area of 46 hectares and was originally known as the Royal Malaysia Navy Dockyard. It became fully operational in 1984. The shipyard is capable of building patrol vessels, fast troop carriers, anchor handling tub, OSVs, luxury yacht hotel and vehicular ferries.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, January 30, 2014; Image: Boustead Naval Shipyard View post tag: Boustead View post tag: shipyard Share this article Industry newslast_img read more

Royal visit for Artisan School of Food

first_imgThe Artisan School of Food had a visit from the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall, who were given a tour around the facilities, and unveiled a plaque to commemorate their visit this week.Their Royal Highnesses visited the School at the Welbeck Estate in Nottinghamshire on Tuesday (25 February), touring its butchery and bakery training rooms, observing practical classes and meeting with the school’s full-time students.They also met with the school’s tutors, trustees and sponsors and were presented with a hamper of food produced by students.Gareth Kennedy, director of The School of Artisan Food, commented: “It has been an enormous pleasure to provide their Royal Highnesses with a tour of the School and to share with them our commitment to training the next generation of handmade food producers.”Opened in October 2009, The School of Artisan Food is the UK’s only not-for-profit school dedicated to artisan food production.It offers short courses and professional qualifications, and specialises in baking, butchery, cheesemaking as well as pickling and preserving.last_img read more

News story: Commander JFC Twitter Q and A

first_imgFrom 5pm to 6pm, on 26 July 2018, Gen Chris will be answering questions about ‘innovation’ in UK defence, and the valuable work that Joint Forces Command is doing in this area.If you have a question about the work carried out in this area, or if you want to know more about why it is important for UK defence to innovate, you can ask Gen Chris a question.All you need to do is send your question as a tweet to the @ComdJFC_UK twitter account. You need to make sure that your tweet includes #AskJFC. This is to help us identify your question when it is sent, and make sure that we do not miss it.While we will aim to answer all questions during the event, we are concentrating this event on the theme of innovation, so will limit our responses to this area.last_img

Pladis appoints McVitie’s and cake general manager

first_imgPladis has appointed Sam Mitchell as McVitie’s and cake general manager.Mitchell will lead the McVitie’s biscuits and cake operation and will sit on the Pladis UK and Ireland leadership team, reporting to managing director Nick Bunker.Pladis described Mitchell as having a wealth of experience in FMCG in commercial sales and marketing, across multiple channels, countries and categories.He most recently led marketing at SHS Drinks and was previously a category director at Mondelez International, where he was responsible for the Northern & Central European biscuits business.“I’m excited to be joining Pladis, particularly as we approach the new year and new opportunities,” said Mitchell.“McVitie’s has been an iconic household name for centuries and through Pladis’ entrepreneurial spirit, commitment to innovation and speed-to-market, I look forward to leading the brand and working with the team to ensure it remains that way for generations to come.”Bunker said: “Sam brings with him a positive ’can do’ attitude and a real desire to deliver growth across both his brands and his team. We’re delighted to have him on board to spearhead our hero brand McVitie’s further through his solid expertise.”last_img read more

Watch Metallica, Jimmy Fallon, and The Roots Perform “Enter Sandman” With Classroom Instruments

first_imgBringing out classroom instruments isn’t anything new for the Tonight Show. It’s always funny to see who Jimmy Fallon will welcome into the musical skit. Last night’s showing brought heavy metal band Metallica to the stage for an epic performance of their 1991 hit “Enter Sandman.” James Hetfield on lead vocals, also sporting a small horn, Lars Ulrich making use of a tiny bongo drum, Jimmy Fallon and the entire Roots crew squeezed themselves into the Music Room – sporting Metallica, Tonight Show, and Roots t-shirts for the acoustic jam.Watch the classroom instrument performance of “Enter Sandman” below:Last night’s episode came after some surprising news from Napster, announcing that Metallica’s new album Hardwired…To Self-Destruct will become available on the streaming service later this week. Previous relationships between Metallica and Napster stirred a landmark case for the music industry, when a song by Metallica was illegally downloaded and saw radio time ahead of its official release. The case was ugly, but has evidently been settled on better terms. Read more here.Metallica’s new album, Hardwired…To Self-Destruct, is being rolled via various platforms this week, with the official release set for this Friday, November 18th.last_img read more

Pizza, Pop & Politics lecture zeroes in on ‘Peer to Peer Politics’

first_imgND Votes hosted its final Pizza, Pop & Politics of the year Tuesday evening, concluding a year of informal lectures from a range of positions on the political spectrum. This week’s installment, “Peer to Peer Politics,” highlighted three seniors who completed theses related to politics in today’s society. Senior Michael Finan spoke about his research regarding the white working class’ unforeseen influence on the outcome of the 2016 presidential election. The 2016 election was not unprecedented but a reflection of recent voting trends, Finan said.“The white working class over the past twenty years has been becoming more Republican,” Finan said. “You can see back in 1992, if you were in the white working class you were actually more likely to identify as a Democrat, and they’ve kind of shifted from a democratic stronghold — blue collar, union workers — to now identifying and voting for Republicans.”This shift led to Donald Trump’s 39 point advantage over Hillary Clinton among white working class voters, Finan said. Finan’s thesis seeks to explain the difference between the voting trends of the white working class base and the white college educated base. He looked at party identification, prominent election issues like economic concerns, moral traditionalism and racial resentment, which he said could not fully explain the gap in voting tendencies. Because of that, he added a third factor: feeling thermometers that measure voters’ attitude toward the candidates.“There’s a lot of debate about the issues, but I don’t think there’s as much attention about the role of the candidates themselves and the role their characteristics played,” Finan said.Positive feelings toward Trump far outweighed negative feelings toward Clinton, belying the narrative that sexism drove Clinton’s loss, Finan said. He concluded that white working class voters are more likely to have a weak party identification and to focus more on the issues and candidates in a particular election.“In the long run, ultimately, I think the Democrats will have to find support elsewhere and the Republicans are going to have to try to incorporate the white working class into the coalition that they have right now,” Finan said.Senior Sarah Tomas Morgan’s thesis discussed the capabilities approach to human development formulated by philosopher Martha Nussbaum and its effect on the United Nations’ sustainable global development goals and the greater involvement of civil society in their creation. The capabilities approach, Tomas Morgan said, is set apart from other comparative methods because of its emphasis on the individual and individual freedoms.“Every individual is an end in and of herself in the capabilities approach,” Tomas Morgan said. “It does not attempt to total or average societal well-being, but rather to compare societies based on the opportunities available to each person. This focus on the individual creates a respect for self-definition, a pluralism of values and a concern for social injustice and inequality in society.”Nussbaum’s theory outlines 10 capabilities deemed necessary to a dignified human life, including health, bodily integrity, practical reason, and control over one’s own environment, Tomas Morgan noted.“They’re answers to the question: What is a person, an individual, able to do and to be?” Tomas Morgan said. “They’re opportunities to choose and to act — a set of substantial freedoms. They’re not just abilities that reside in a person, but they’re freedoms and opportunities created by a combination of personal ability and the political social and economic environment.”It is therefore the task of an effective government to secure a base level of these freedoms for all citizens so they can pursue a “dignified and minimally flourishing life,” Tomas Morgan said. The way to implement such freedoms is through the involvement of civil society, which played a central role in creating the sustainable development goals the UN set forth in 2015 and is necessary to creating a better life for all members of any community, Tomas Morgan concluded.“Deliberative democracy grounds democracy in the exchange of reason for the purpose of democratic decision making,” Tomas Morgan said. “The primary aim of all these bodies is the same — to enhance both the rational justification for and the popular sanction for political decisions.”Senior Roge Karma discussed the dichotomy of the American narrative, which pits the narrative of the nation as a source of oppression and against that of American exceptionalism. Neither of these narratives, Karma said, truly capture American history. Karma’s thesis explores the question of ideal civic education from the perspective of creating the ideal citizen. The two central parts of that education, Karma said, are estrangement and love.“Civic estrangement is the intellectual or emotional experience of grasping fundamental contradictions between what a given society states are its ideals and reality,” Karma said. “As a result, the perceptive citizen is no longer at home, no longer at one with the nation, but recognizes it as strange, foreign, not in harmony. It’s a disjunctive experience. You don’t feel at home because the ideals that you identify with are not being lived up to.”This estrangement is necessary to identifying the gaps between a nation’s ideals and its realities, Karma said. Patriotic love, on the other hand, is necessary to fixing those gaps — together, Karma said they create an ideal citizen willing to criticize and also fix his nation.“How I define patriotic love is as ends-oriented,” he said. “It operates with the ideal of the nation in mind. So what I love about my nation isn’t necessarily everything it does, but what it stands for, what it aspires towards. I argue that this form of patriotic love is actually necessary in order to be willing to close the gap between ideals and realities. If we’re trying to cultivate the ideal citizen, we can’t rely on self-interest. I can’t just fight and struggle for an issue because it affects me.”Karma examined what he said is the most popular American history textbook used in high schools today, ’American Pageant,’ focusing specifically on foreign policy in the Woodrow Wilson era, and found it pushed an agenda of American exceptionalism that failed his criteria for creating an ideal citizen.“What this narrative serves to do is it puts forward an affirmative national narrative trying to cultivate a sense of love for country,” Karma said. “But in doing so, it conflates American ideals and realities. It leaves no room for critical thinking, no room for empathy, no room for estrangement. If you believe that every one of your nation’s actions are going to be necessarily just and good, how are you ever going to spot a gap between their ideals and those realities?”Tags: Michael Finan, Peer to Peer Politics, Pizza Pop and Politics, Roge Karma, Sarah TomasMorganlast_img read more

Brazilian Armed Forces Summit Aligns Electronic Warfare Knowledge

first_imgBy Andréa Barretto/Diálogo November 21, 2017 Nearly 100 service members and civilians participated in the eighth Electronic Warfare Defense Summit (EGED, per its Portuguese acronym) September 13th–14th, 2017. The event was held at the Department of Science and Technology of the Brazilian Army (EB, per its Portuguese acronym) in Brasilia. One of Brazil’s three armed forces organizes each edition of the annual event. In 2017, EB led the activities through its Electronic Warfare Instruction Center (CIGE, per its Portuguese acronym). The unit belongs to the Army Electronic Warfare Communications Command and trains service members in this field. “Service members from the three branches always participate in EGED. They meet to discuss and present the main electronic warfare projects that are being developed in the defense field,” EB Colonel Luis Carlos Sousa, commandant of CIGE, explained. “Electronic warfare is modern, dynamic, and constant. New things emerge every day in this area. At EGED, we have the opportunity to keep up with what the industry and academia do, which often provides solutions our military assets can use,” said Brazilian Navy Captain Marcelo Alcides Albuquerque da Costa, commandant of the Navy Electronic Warfare Center (CGEM, per its Portuguese acronym), which will coordinate the 2018 EGED. Electronic versus cyber warfare Electronic warfare involves the use of the electromagnetic spectrum through communication and non-communication. “The communication side concerns electromagnetic signals that carry information, such as radios,” Col. Luis Carlos explained. “The non-communication side deals with signals that do not transmit content since the signal itself constitutes the message, as in the case of radar.” In turn, cyber warfare focuses on other aspects, such as integrated computer networks. “But the two intersect because when a cyber attack goes through wireless networks, it enters the electromagnetic spectrum. These areas are very close to each other. Integration between electronic warfare and cyber warfare operations was even one of the points discussed at the summit,” Capt. Albuquerque said. Within the Brazilian Armed Forces, different organizations handle each of the two defense fields, but the approach to both has become increasingly intertwined as they develop, said Capt. Albuquerque. Exchange of experiences During the EGED’s two-day event, representatives of the Brazilian Army, Navy, and Air Force presented the main projects and activities underway in the field of electronic warfare—as well as the challenges and demands relating to that area of responsibility. Among the issues discussed: Brazil’s Integrated Border Monitoring System (SISFRON, per its Portuguese acronym) stood out. As one of EB’s more robust programs, SISFRON relies on ground surveillance radar, communication equipment, and satellite transmission, among others, to expand monitoring along Brazil’s continental border. The objective is to gather the maximum amount of information via such equipment for strategic decision-making by the nation’s defense authorities. “The development of SISFRON depends on knowledge about the electromagnetic environment. And the model EB used to set up the program was one of the points disseminated and discussed at the summit,” Col. Luis Carlos said. “EGED’s objective is just that: share knowledge about projects that work well with any of our service branches, so that it can be of use to the other branches, minimize redundancies, and optimize results,” he said. Interoperability in the electronic warfare activities the Brazilian Armed Forces develop is the first objective enumerated in Brazil’s Defense Electronic Warfare Policy, established by Regulatory Decree No. 333, issued in 2004. For the joint effort to be possible, alignment of military doctrine with electronic warfare is an essential step. The Brazilian Armed Forces learned that lesson through practice exercises and participation in events such as EGED. Capt. Albuquerque stressed the importance of having the service branches work jointly and cited an example: “The Navy was developing a project in communication and detected a signal in the Amazon. On that occasion, we got in touch with the Brazilian Army, which immediately supported us and provided the data we needed,” Capt. Albuquerque said. “So we managed to detect together that the transmission was of a conversation spoken in an indigenous dialect, and we understood what was happening.” The partnership with the Brazilian Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym) is frequent. With its aircraft, FAB undertakes surveillance operations of Brazil’s maritime territory. As the aircraft flies over an area, the onboard equipment collects data that is sent to the Navy and added to what teams on its ships gathered. This joint information sharing serves as the basis to guide naval patrols in the region. Nearly 100 service members and civilians participated in the eighth Electronic Warfare Defense Summit (EGED, per its Portuguese acronym) September 13th–14th, 2017. The event was held at the Department of Science and Technology of the Brazilian Army (EB, per its Portuguese acronym) in Brasilia. One of Brazil’s three armed forces organizes each edition of the annual event. In 2017, EB led the activities through its Electronic Warfare Instruction Center (CIGE, per its Portuguese acronym). The unit belongs to the Army Electronic Warfare Communications Command and trains service members in this field. “Service members from the three branches always participate in EGED. They meet to discuss and present the main electronic warfare projects that are being developed in the defense field,” EB Colonel Luis Carlos Sousa, commandant of CIGE, explained. “Electronic warfare is modern, dynamic, and constant. New things emerge every day in this area. At EGED, we have the opportunity to keep up with what the industry and academia do, which often provides solutions our military assets can use,” said Brazilian Navy Captain Marcelo Alcides Albuquerque da Costa, commandant of the Navy Electronic Warfare Center (CGEM, per its Portuguese acronym), which will coordinate the 2018 EGED. Electronic versus cyber warfare Electronic warfare involves the use of the electromagnetic spectrum through communication and non-communication. “The communication side concerns electromagnetic signals that carry information, such as radios,” Col. Luis Carlos explained. “The non-communication side deals with signals that do not transmit content since the signal itself constitutes the message, as in the case of radar.” In turn, cyber warfare focuses on other aspects, such as integrated computer networks. “But the two intersect because when a cyber attack goes through wireless networks, it enters the electromagnetic spectrum. These areas are very close to each other. Integration between electronic warfare and cyber warfare operations was even one of the points discussed at the summit,” Capt. Albuquerque said. Within the Brazilian Armed Forces, different organizations handle each of the two defense fields, but the approach to both has become increasingly intertwined as they develop, said Capt. Albuquerque. Exchange of experiences During the EGED’s two-day event, representatives of the Brazilian Army, Navy, and Air Force presented the main projects and activities underway in the field of electronic warfare—as well as the challenges and demands relating to that area of responsibility. Among the issues discussed: Brazil’s Integrated Border Monitoring System (SISFRON, per its Portuguese acronym) stood out. As one of EB’s more robust programs, SISFRON relies on ground surveillance radar, communication equipment, and satellite transmission, among others, to expand monitoring along Brazil’s continental border. The objective is to gather the maximum amount of information via such equipment for strategic decision-making by the nation’s defense authorities. “The development of SISFRON depends on knowledge about the electromagnetic environment. And the model EB used to set up the program was one of the points disseminated and discussed at the summit,” Col. Luis Carlos said. “EGED’s objective is just that: share knowledge about projects that work well with any of our service branches, so that it can be of use to the other branches, minimize redundancies, and optimize results,” he said. Interoperability in the electronic warfare activities the Brazilian Armed Forces develop is the first objective enumerated in Brazil’s Defense Electronic Warfare Policy, established by Regulatory Decree No. 333, issued in 2004. For the joint effort to be possible, alignment of military doctrine with electronic warfare is an essential step. The Brazilian Armed Forces learned that lesson through practice exercises and participation in events such as EGED. Capt. Albuquerque stressed the importance of having the service branches work jointly and cited an example: “The Navy was developing a project in communication and detected a signal in the Amazon. On that occasion, we got in touch with the Brazilian Army, which immediately supported us and provided the data we needed,” Capt. Albuquerque said. “So we managed to detect together that the transmission was of a conversation spoken in an indigenous dialect, and we understood what was happening.” The partnership with the Brazilian Air Force (FAB, per its Portuguese acronym) is frequent. With its aircraft, FAB undertakes surveillance operations of Brazil’s maritime territory. As the aircraft flies over an area, the onboard equipment collects data that is sent to the Navy and added to what teams on its ships gathered. This joint information sharing serves as the basis to guide naval patrols in the region.last_img read more

Great Neck Nude Photo Extortionist’s Victims Describe Relentless Stalking

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Some victims of a Republican presidential campaigner from Long Island who tried extorting nude photos from 15 women fled the country, sought therapy and hired private investigators to deal with the stalking.Those were among new details described in court documents when U.S. District Judge Marianna Battani this week sentenced 22-year-old Adam Savader of Great Neck to 2 ½ years in federal prison despite his attorneys’ blaming the hacking on mental health issues sparked by working on Newt Gingrich’s failed presidential campaign.“He said that he had hacked into my email and Facebook accounts, found explicit photos of me, and that if I did not send more to him he would use them against me,” one of the unidentified victims wrote in a letter to the court. “This harassment continued relentlessly for days at a time, would stop for a few days, and then resume again from a different number.”Savader—who later worked on Mitt Romney’s bid for the White House—had pleaded guilty in November to cyber stalking and Internet extortion at federal court in Michigan, where some of the victims went to college. Authorities said they found victims in at least three states that were targeted between 2012 and early 2013, after the campaign.“I’m trying to make it right,” Savader told the court in his apology, reported The Associated Press, which noted he was quoting President Bill Clinton’s apology for his affair with Monica Lewinsky.It was a much different tone than the sexually aggressive taunts that prosecutors outlined in their sentencing recommendation.“Just came to u,” he wrote to one of the victims two weeks before Election Day while he was on the GOP campaign trail. “Ur so hot. Every1 will be doing the same if you don’t respond.”Savader threatened to send the photos to various people in the victims’ lives, including their parents, their boyfriends’ parents,  sororities, employers, internships—even the Republican National Committee.He often sent victims a link to a website to which he had uploaded their nude photos to prove he had them and warned that he would share the link if they didn’t send more. More victims came forward after the case made news. Investigators said they found 45 nude photos of the victims in Savader’s files—some of whom could not be contacted.One victim wrote she had to turn her phone off to stop receiving the relentless threatening messages. It was impossible to block the numbers because they were constantly changing, she wrote.“In an effort to escape this situation [one victim] left school in January 2013 to study abroad halfway around the world,” prosecutors said in the documents.Countering his lawyers’ arguments that Savader’s mental health diagnoses should be considered as a mitigating factor, prosecutors asked: “If he didn’t believe his behavior was criminal, why did he take so many deliberate steps to conceal his identity and hide his electronic footprint?”Authorities also noted that the victims are not to blame for storing intimate photos on password-protected email accounts, which they likened to “the modern-day equivalent of storing photographs in a shoe-box, in a closed bedroom closet, behind a locked door.”last_img read more