Tag Archive: 杭州妃子阁

Film footage of County Limerick event sparks call for coursing ban

first_imgTwitter Limerick campaigner seeks referendum on animal rights Limerick man celebrating ban on wild animals in circuses TAGSArdpatrick and Kilfinane Hare Coursing ClubcoursingIrish Council Against Blood Sports (ICABS)Irish Coursing ClubJohn Carmodylimerick Limerick animal rights group cease operations THE Irish Council Against Blood Sports (ICABS) have called for a permanent ban on hare coursing following allegations of animals being “savagely mauled” at a coursing event in County Limerick last weekend.Anti blood sports campaigners captured horrific footage of hares being struck multiple times and mauled into the ground by the muzzled dogs at the Ardpatrick and Kilfinane coursing event.“It exposes the myth of cruelty-free coursing that the government claims has been the result of muzzling greyhounds at Irish hare coursing events,” animal rights activist John Fitzgerald said of the footage.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “The cruelty was filmed despite frenzied efforts by the coursing club to prevent filming by positioning vehicles to block the vision and paths of the camera people. The film shows the unfortunate hares being savaged and shows one of them being put down by a dispatcher who is running off the field with the doomed animal,” he explained.ICABS intend to present this latest footage to Arts and Heritage Minister Heather Humphreys as further evidence that “hare coursing is beyond reform and that the so-called regulations introduced to protect hares are worthless”.“Witnessing these appalling scenes at the Ardpatrick and Kilfinane coursing meeting, it was never clearer that the time has come for this shameful bloodsport to be finally banned in Ireland,” an ICABS spokesman told the Limerick Post.“ICABS is again contacting Minister Humphreys, the Taoiseach and the National Parks and Wildlife Service to demand an immediate withdrawal of the 2017-18 coursing licence.”They are also calling on Limerick people to contact their local TDs and urge them to back a ban on hare coursing.Limerick animal rights activist John Carmody described coursing as “a ghastly reminder of how backward and outdated we are as a nation and how indifferent we are to the plight of these gentle creatures”.“How can the Government on one hand ban the use of wild animals in circuses and yet allow this most grotesque activity that has went well beyond its time — from an era when we knew no better?” he asked.There was no response from the Irish Coursing Club at the time of going to print.by Alan [email protected] Previous articleLimerick schools send the Fairtrade messageNext articleFontaine Zing will enhance lovelife in Limerick Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Linkedin NewsLocal NewsFilm footage of County Limerick event sparks call for coursing banBy Alan Jacques – November 23, 2017 3784 Emailcenter_img Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Pregnant hares held in Glin coursing compound Print Facebook John marks 21 years at the forefront of animal rights Limerick woman highlights plight of circus elephantslast_img read more

Ocean City Gets Ready for the Holidays

first_imgShoppers dress in pajamas and festive costumes to get into the holiday spirit during the “Earlier Than The Bird” event each year in November. Downtown Asbury Avenue is decorated for the holidays, and a full schedule of special events is coming up quickly.  The celebrations in Ocean City begin with “Earlier Than the Bird” on Saturday, Nov. 23. The annual downtown shopping extravaganza takes place 8 a.m. to noon on the Saturday before Thanksgiving. Jump-start your holiday shopping and shop in your pajamas for early-bird shopping specials at stores on Asbury Avenue between Sixth Street and 11th Street. Free turkeys will be awarded to the best-dressed, and shoppers can text in to win gift certificates and prizes from downtown merchants. Free coffee will be available at Jon & Patty’s (637 Asbury Avenue), Ocean City Coffee Company (917 Asbury Avenue) and Starbucks (1061 Asbury Avenue). Shoppers also can enjoy a free standard doughnut at Drip ’N’ Scoop (960 Asbury Avenue). Free horse-and-carriage rides will be available starting on the weekend of Nov. 23 and 24. Ride the downtown the old-fashioned way noon to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Board the carriages in front of City Hall at Ninth Street and Asbury Avenue. The 12th annual Fast and Furriest 5K Turkey Trot goes off at 8 a.m. Thanksgiving morning on Nov. 28. The course for this 5-kilometer (3.1-mile) race is on the Ocean City Boardwalk, and proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Ocean City. For more information, call 609-398-9500 (ext. 4) or visit www.hsocnj.org/events.  Ocean City’s small-town version of “Black Friday” takes place on Friday, Nov. 29. The Christmas in the Downtown – “Our Miracle on Asbury Avenue” – takes place 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The event will be a warm and entertaining time featuring carolers and performers throughout downtown Asbury Avenue between Sixth Street and 11th Street.  Downtown stores will offer discount shopping for gifts, and many Asbury Avenue restaurants will be open. Free horse-and-carriage rides will be available. Entertainment and Christmas carols will begin at 4 p.m. on the steps of City Hall at Ninth Street and Asbury Avenue. The event culminates around 5 p.m. when Santa Claus will emerge on the rooftop of City Hall. With the help of an Ocean City Fire Department ladder truck, Santa will descend and help light the City Hall Christmas Tree and illuminate City Hall. Santa will make an appearance Friday, Nov. 29 for the Christmas in the downtown – “Our Miracle on Asbury Avenue” — holiday spectacle. (Photo courtesy of City of Ocean City)The shopping discounts will continue on Nov. 30 as downtown merchants celebrate Small Business Saturday. On the evening of Nov. 30, music lovers can enjoy a special performance of the Ocean City Pops Orchestra. “Holiday Pops: Musical Sounds of the Season” will feature popular holiday and special performances by vocalist Scott Coulter and his cast of Broadway soloists. Children of all ages will enjoy the classic Christmas songs. Joining the show will be professional dancers from the Atlantic City Ballet’s production of the “Nutcracker.” The show starts at 7:30 p.m. at the Ocean City Music Pier. Tickets are $25 and $20. Call 609-399-6111 or visit oceancityvacation.com/boxoffice. The festivities continue with the annual Christmas Parade (Dec. 6), Ocean City Theatre Company’s “Lights, Camera, Christmas: 2019 Holiday Spectacular (Dec. 13-22, see oceancityvacation.com/boxoffice for information and tickets) and the First Night (Dec. 31) and First Day (Jan. 1) New Year’s celebrations.  FIRST NIGHT BUTTONS ON SALE NOW: All-inclusive admission buttons for Ocean City’s popular and family-friendly First Night New Year’s Eve celebration are on sale now. The price is a discounted $15 through Nov. 30, and they can be purchased at oceancityvacation.com/boxoffice or by calling 609-399-6111. You can also purchase tickets in person by visiting the Roy Gillian Welcome Center on the Ninth Street causeway, City Hall’s Welcome Center at 861 Asbury Avenue or the Welcome Center at 46th Street and West Avenue.  First Night includes more than 70 shows and activities at venues throughout Ocean City. Visit firstnightocnj.com for more information. Fireworks will light up the sky to cap the First Night celebration and ring in the New Year.ALSO COMING UP: WOMEN OF WONDER LUNCHEON (Nov. 14): The Atlantic Cape Community College Foundation and the Cape May County Women’s Commission invite the public to the 2019 Women of Wonder Luncheon 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 at the Flanders Hotel in Ocean City. Ocean City Free Public Library Director Karen Mahar will be honored, along with Stormy Freese and Shirley “Becki” Wilson. Tickets for this scholarship fundraiser are available by visiting www.atlantic.edu/wow or calling 609-463-3621.         BOZ SCAGGS (Nov. 16): Rescheduled from July 1, this sold-out concert featuring Grammy Award-winner and songwriter Boz Scaggs will bring chart-topping hits to the Ocean City Music Pier. The concert begins at 7 p.m. at the Ocean City Music Pier. Call 609-399-6111 to check on last-minute availability.  CITIZEN OF THE YEAR AND BUSINESS AWARDS DINNER (Nov. 26): The Ocean City Regional Chamber of Commerce will honor Ocean City Primary School teacher Carrie Merritt as 2019 Citizen of the Year at its annual dinner 6 p.m. Nov. 26 at the Flanders Hotel. The Chamber also awards local businesses in a variety of categories. For more information and reservations, call 609-399-1412 or email [email protected]  POTTERY & MOSAIC SALE (Dec. 2 to 14): The Ocean City Arts Center (1735 Simpson Avenue) will host its Pottery and Mosaic Sale 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays. A meet-the-artists reception will be held 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5.last_img read more

UCLA basketball notes: Afflalo: Don’t look past ASU

first_imgThat is what the fifth-ranked Bruins are selling this week as reason not to take lowly ASU lightly tonight at Wells Fargo Arena in Tempe, Ariz. “It doesn’t look good over the long haul, but each individual game is different,” Bruins guard Aaron Afflalo said. “That team has the potential to beat you. If you look at each individual game, that potential to win was always there. But they’re so young, and they don’t have the experience of winning all the time. That can catch up with you.” Arizona State has lost its past four games by a combined 14points and missed an open shot and a chance to beat Washington State in the closing seconds. When the Sun Devils were in Pauley Pavilion last month, they held an early lead, and trailed by a handful of points before UCLA pulled away for a 10-point win. Afflalo came up with another rationale for not peeking ahead to Saturday’s game at Arizona. “It would make absolutely no sense for us to go in there (to Arizona State) and think we have a victory,” Afflalo said. “We’re already coming off a loss. We haven’t been that great on the road ourselves, only 50 percent. For a team with our capability and our talent, we should be much better. So we need this one bad.” UCLA is 14-0 at home and 4-0 on neutral courts, but the road is another issue. The Bruins traveled three time zones and 3,000 miles to lose at West Virginia on Saturday. They also split road trips to Oregon State and Oregon, and California and Stanford, winning easily against a much inferior team in the first game before falling on the back end of the trip. Chasing history: Arizona State is heading toward the first winless season in Pacific-10 Conference history. In fact, if the Sun Devils fail to get out of the weekend with a win, they will be the first Pac-10 team to lose its first 15 conference games of a season. Arizona (1982-83) and Washington State (1999-2000, 2002-03) are the only programs to begin 0-14, and all three of those teams won their 15th game, according to the Pac-10. Two teams in the Pac-8 went 0-14 – Oregon (1971-72) and USC (1975-76). center_img If the Sun Devils go 0-18 – they host UCLA and USC this week and Arizona next week before closing the season at Stanford and Cal – they will do it in dubious style. Arizona State is last in the Pac-10 in scoring offense (59.2ppg) and field-goal percentage (41.1), and ninth in 3-point percentage (31.3) Planting a seed: Count Bruins coach Ben Howland among those who do not believe UCLA hurt its chances of earning the No.1 seed in the West in the NCAA Tournament by losing to West Virginia, especially since point guard Darren Collison (shoulder) did not play. “It’s all based on what we do from here on out, depending on how we go,” Howland said. “It’s a loss. We’re still No. 1 in the RPI. So, although it’s a loss, it’s a loss against a good team on the road. But that remains to be seen. It’s totally depending on what we do with the rest of our games here in the regular season.” A top seed in the West means playing the first two rounds in Sacramento. The regional semifinals and final are in San Jose. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Modeling Just-So Stories for Earth History

first_imgModels are only simulations of reality.  In science, they have a long history of simplifying complex physical phenomena in an attempt to understand them.  Many times, empirical evidence can correct a model.  The model then becomes a more accurate simulation, and can even provide additional insights and make predictions.  Can modeling work for the unobservable, unrepeatable past?    A story posted on Space.com has a title like a Kipling fictional story: “Why Early Earth Did Not Freeze.”  Reporter Aaron L. Gronstal for Astrobiology Magazine addressed a well-known puzzle in climate history: how the early earth prevented a deep freeze.  According to stellar evolution theory, stars like our sun begin with much lower luminosity.  Four billion years ago, the sun would not have had enough energy to keep Earth’s oceans from freezing.  Yet evolutionists and geologists believe that the earth had liquid oceans at least as early as 3.7 billion years ago.  This is the “faint young sun paradox.”  Geophysicists and climate historians have proposed more “greenhouse effect” or meteor bombardments to warm the earth, but without convincing success.  Most doubt that there could have been enough carbon dioxide, methane or ammonia to provide a space blanket.    Gronstal reported models by German scientists that reduce the amount of carbon dioxide required to heat the earth.  “The model showed that a partial pressure of only 2.9 millibars of CO2 would have been needed during the late Archaean and early Proterozoic periods in order to bring the surface temperature of the Earth above freezing,” the article said.  “This result, although contrary to previous studies, agrees with current geological data.”  The paradox thus disappears.    Whether this claim will have ripple effects on assumptions about the impact of carbon dioxide remains to be seen.  Will it renew fears about global warming?  What does it mean to other geological periods when life was present?  And a question for philosophers of science: what was driving the model – the physics, or the assumptions of stellar and geological theories?    Another geology news story is shaking up the world – so to speak.  National Geographic News claimed that continents get pushed, not sucked, into place.  This new idea, “contrary to accepted theory,” rearranges ideas about a theoretical supercontinent named Pangaea that split up 200 million years ago on the evolutionary timeline.  This “provocative” new theory pictures the continents moving back-and-forth like an accordion, instead of by the suction of deep ocean basins.  Maybe a superplume of magma in the mantle is the driving force.    Yet the article includes doubts that geologists know any of this, because like the climate story above, it is based on models:This accordionlike action, dubbed the Wilson Cycle, has been recognized for more than 40 years, but the forces responsible for it are unknown.    Moreover, if current models thought to be responsible for these movements were applied to a 500-million-year-old Earth, they would not produce Pangaea in the right configuration.    Why this reversal happened is unclear, and that’s disconcerting, [J. Brendan] Murphy said, because even though Pangaea is the best studied of the supercontinents, “something happened that we don’t understand.”Murphy agreed that his model is “speculative.”  Applying the model forward, he said it makes Earth’s future “a lot more fun to study” even though he could never know the outcome, because a new supercontinent wouldn’t form for 75 million years.    National Geographic quoted Murphy explaining where continental motion fits into grand schemes of evolution.  “Most people believe that for at least the last two and a half billion years, the Earth’s history has been dominated by the amalgamation, breakup, and reforming of supercontinents,” he said.  “It really is an underpinning of the evolution of the planet.”    The new ideas were reported also in a short article in Science Daily called “Pangaea Conundrum.”With the faint-young-sun story, we have another case of a contradiction that should have falsified a belief being circumvented by tweaking a simulation.  And with the Pangaea story, we have geologists playing games on the job.    This is like what the evolutionary biologists do with their in silico organisms (imaginary life-forms that can evolve in ways real organisms never could).  Climate is very complex and difficult to model, even for today’s weather.  Can these scientists really know what carbon dioxide did to the earth 3.9 billion years ago, without going back there in a time machine?  How many other factors (clouds, outgassing, feedback mechanisms) could have swamped the effects of carbon dioxide? (for instance, see this article on EurekAlert that explores possible effects of giant ocean eddies that might have a “profound influence on marine life and on the earth’s climate”).  How justifiable is it to run present observed continental motions back recklessly for billions of years into the past?  The observation-to-assumption ratio is so small it is like homeopathic medicine – one molecule of data in a swimming pool of speculation.    Models that cannot be checked with empirical data become playgrounds for storytellers.  Never are these astro-geo-biologists content to follow the evidence and say, “Well, I guess the earth couldn’t be as old as that.”  No way; they have their timeline, with its mythical Late Heavy Bombardment, First Oxygenation Event (after the mythical Origin of Life), mythical supercontinents Pangaea, Rodinia and Gondwana (which sound like characters in an earth religion), and all the subsequent Darwinian fables that ride on top.  When a contradiction threatens the Grand Myth, they can always invent simulations that can be tweaked and forced sufficiently to match their hard-core, unalterable beliefs about billions of years and evolution.  Models become their carts before the observational horse.  Who needs a horse?  They have horseless carriages, driven by the gas of imagination, polluting the atmosphere of knowledge.    Whether this is Model A or Model T, we don’t know.  Even a broken flivver can be pushed if it won’t go on its own and the horse is going in the other direction.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

The Potwine Passivhaus in Amherst

first_imgAs they set out to build a single-family Passivhaus on Potwine Lane in Amherst, Massachusetts, Alexi Arango and LeeAnn Kim asked themselves, “Is it possible to live without burning fossil fuels?” One measure of success would be meeting their goal of net-zero energy performance. In this first blog in a planned series, Arango reports on the start of their project. On Friday, Don (the carpenter) and Jim (his helper/painter) installed the expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam.They fit the foam pieces together like a jigsaw puzzle on top of the flowable fill and reported that it was relatively easy to set everything in place. The 8-inch-thick foam pieces are apparently heavier than they look. The raised side wall will insulate the side of the concrete slab while also creating a bowl in which to pour the concrete. You can see that half of air-vapor barrier has been laid down already. Next week, hopefully, we’ll get to pour the concrete. January 18, 2014: Flowable fillI got a text on Wednesday from my neighbor Jesse saying “concrete!” and I dropped the grant proposal I was editing and raced over to the lot. When I showed up, though, I realized that it wasn’t concrete — even though it looks like concrete and the truck probably looked like a concrete truck — it was the flowable fill. Inspired by the BrightBuilt BarnMy own inspiration to build a Passivhaus came when I met Keith Collins at an MIT Energy Conference in 2009. I was awestruck by Keith’s story of how he built the BrightBuilt Barn, a net-zero home in Maine that shockingly doesn’t have a furnace — doesn’t need one, to be precise, even in the winter.What? How is that possible?Amazingly, body heat, residual heat from the lights, and solar gain during the day are sufficient to keep the BrightBuilt Barn warm. For years, I kept the postcard from Keith on my desk and, later, pinned it on my fridge, slowly nurturing the dream of one day building my own BrightBuilt Barn.And here I am, anxiously waiting a building permit from the town of Amherst before it gets too cold and the ground freezes. The Potwine Passive House is a modified version of the BrightBuilt Barn, slightly larger and revised to function seamlessly as a stand-alone residence. Breaking groundHere’s a photo showing the progress, complete with fun tractors and big piles of dirt. We’ve broken ground!The topsoil was removed and the remaining soil was compacted. You can see how the water, sewer, electrical, PV and communications conduits and stub-ups are already set into place. Hay with black plastic on top are keeping the ground from freezing. January 15, 2014: Finding solar southThe whole house design hinges on a south facing structure. Unfortunately, you can’t just use the compass in your iPhone to figure out which way is south. A compass points to the magnetic south (which is strangely enough the north end of the earth’s magnetic dipole), but we want to point the house toward the sun — midway between sunrise and sunset — often referred to as “solar south.” This will ensure that the south face of the house is exposed to sunlight symmetrically — the same amount of sunlight in the morning as in the afternoon.Mary (a friend) and I went out to the lot at midday (which happened to be at 11:45 a.m., halfway between sunrise and sunset), and we put the thin green stakes in the ground in line with the shadow cast by sun to indicate the direction of solar south. The next day, Kyle (the builder) and I placed the wooden stakes with orange streamers at the four corners of the home. The footprint looks so small! That’s what went through my mind when I saw the 26 ft. by 26 ft. square, the location of the outside corners of the walls. I wonder if it will feel too small when it’s finished. Oh boy.We angled the house slightly westward to help avoid looking directly at the neighbor’s home. Matt (the architect) believed that the exact angle south wouldn’t significantly affect the solar heat gain. January 5, 2014: Reaching out to neighborsSome of my new neighbors might be curious about the activity on their street, so I made up this postcard that I’ll drop in their mailboxes. I thought it would be nice to let them know what’s going on, but really I’m interested in getting started on my ambitious plan of world domination — by convincing everyone to live in ultra-efficient tiny houses!Here are some of the most striking energy efficiency features of the Potwine Passive House, as listed in the postcard: south facing windows capture heat from sunlight during the day; a concrete floor absorbs the heat and releases it at night; highly insulating (R-50) walls and triple-pane windows (R-6) help keep the heat in; a heat-recovery ventilator and a heat-recovery drain pipe help conserve energy; and LED lights save electricity while looking great. I’ll talk more in depth about these features in future blog posts.center_img Alexi Arango is an assistant professor of physics at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts, where he and his students conduct research on next-generation photovoltaic cells. Arango teaches a joint physics/environmental studies course on renewable energy. Arango’s blog is called Potwine Passive House. November 30, 2013: A series of catastrophesIn retrospect, it was not a wise decision to build this house. It’s been over a year now of endless catastrophe — an emotional up and down of “Wow, this is the best thing ever” to “How did I get myself into this anxiety-producing, money-losing, relationship-killing mess?”I consoled myself by walking down to the bridge to take in the beautiful landscape, until the beavers moved in and flooded the place. Then it was the apple orchard, a delightful spot in the spring in full bloom, until I arrived to find three trees chopped down.Securing the loan and signing the construction contract was a difficult process; long and stressful, with many painful financial decisions — everything about the entire house had to be fully specified. Now, in spite of all this, a permit is likely to be issued soon, and once that happens the project is set to begin — ushering in a smooth, effortless and faster-than-expected building phase; I’m sure of it. What’s flowable fill? It’s a thin layer of cement, sand and water mixture that provides at flat, smooth and void-free surface. It’s not as strong as concrete, but doesn’t need to be: it’s simply a more convenient option than trying to smooth out the base layer of structural fill (the compacted sand/gravel mixture). The various pipes that you see sticking up are the electrical lines and water lines (in the center), the sewage drain (on the right) and the conduit for phone, electricals, cable and some other mysterious stuff that I don’t know about (on the left).The image that appears at the bottom of this article shows the cross section of the whole foundation, called a frost-protected shallow foundation (FPSF). The illustration comes from a Journal of Light Construction article written by Alan Gibson, co-owner of GOLogic. In the article, Alan describes the cost savings of a slab foundation, the site preparation requirements, the foam insulation requirements and the technique for pouring the concrete. The EPS foam has been delivered. Once the structural fill is put down over the compacted dirt, the EPS foam will be laid down and will serve as a container in which to pour the concrete. The resulting concrete slab will be the downstairs floor inside the home. December 8, 2013: An overwhelming desire for a healthier environmentWe — our society — are observing the slow-motion decay of the world to the point where the next generation will be left with a planet that is barely hospitable to life.Even though many awesome solutions exist that could be implemented right away — high-speed trains, bikeable cities, solar panels, wind energy and zero-energy homes (sure, there are enormous challenges) — armies of lobbyists, media figures, politicians and executives are standing in the way, unable to set aside their own small self-interests for the greater good of humanity and the ecosystem. Despite an overwhelming public desire for a healthier environment, we are held hostage by a tiny minority of plutocrats. It feels like there’s nothing we can do about it.When we talk about zero-energy homes, many of the complicated pros and cons fall away and the discussion turns more hopeful. Owning your own home is a mainstay of the American dream. We can all easily picture adding more insulation to the walls, upgrading the furnace to a heat pump, upgrading the windows to triple-pane, and replacing the stove with an induction cooktop.The cost savings are modest, but the energy savings are enormous. No birds are harmed in the process. There’s no nuclear waste to contend with. Relatively few entrenched interests stand in the way. To me it’s a demonstration that real solutions exist, that they are practical and can have a profound impact without requiring undo sacrifice or shifting the burden elsewhere.The project has been super cool and fun; there’s something about a technologically sophisticated house that really captures my boyish imagination: building stuff, doing it ahead of the curve, and with a laudable purpose.last_img read more