Tag Archive: 大学旁边的酒店炮火连天

Ericsson Internet Community Awards

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Ericsson Internet Community Awards Howard Lake | 8 January 1999 | News LM Ericsson, the global data communications and telecommunications company, is offering $250,000 in Web development services and expenses to non-profit organisations from around the world in the inaugural Ericsson Internet Community Awards, the ERICA. LM Ericsson, the global data communications and telecommunications company, is offering $250,000 in Web development services and expenses to non-profit organisations from around the world in the inaugural Ericsson Internet Community Awards, the ERICA. From 11 January 1999 to 31 March 1999 ERICA is seeking new and creative ideas for technology applications that take advantage of the community-building power of the Internet. The awards are open to all charitable non-profit organizations (U.S. 501(c) (3) or equivalent). Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

MIC Student Experience Virtual Sessions

first_imgNewsEducationLimerickMIC Student Experience Virtual SessionsBy Sarah Carr – May 7, 2021 74 Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin Print RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Mary Immaculate College LimerickPicture Credit Brian Gavin/Press 22THE MIC Student Experience virtual sessions, set to take place on the 1 and 2 of June, will see students from both MIC Limerick and MIC Thurles, and graduates who are now pursuing a range of further study and career paths, talk about college life. The free-flowing in conversation sessions will cover topics such as how to navigate the transition to third-level education, tips on managing finances, sporting and social life at MIC and much more.  Session participants will also talk about their programme of study.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up  According to Dr Geraldine Brosnan, MIC Director of Student Life, “Students today are looking for the complete college experience – an excellent education, great student supports, a vibrant student scene and a good balance between college work and recreational time. The MIC Student Experience sessions will be an ideal opportunity for CAO Change of Mind applicants to get an insight into what college life at MIC is all about.” Dr Brosnan adds that MIC prides itself on offering excellence in teaching, learning and research, and under the normal run of events offers plenty of opportunities to get involved in sporting, cultural and social activities. Highly sought-after degrees combined with extremely responsive student services means that students get a rounded education at MIC and are supported every step of the way. The teaching and learning experience along with cultural, sporting and artistic opportunities, as well as welfare and support services such as health facilities, counselling and pastoral care, are what makes the MIC student experience so unique.  According to Emma Byrne, 1 Year BA in Education, Gaeilge and Business Studies student in MIC Thurles, “Although college life consisted of a laptop and home this year, I still felt a sense of belonging to MIC. The approachable lecturers, realistic deadlines and shorter days made my first year very enjoyable. I found Irish grinds with MIC provided support and gave me lots of confidence with the language. MIC is a student-centred college that prioritises us – I am really looking forward to life in MIC Thurles with friends when things get back to normal!” A large part of the student experience is engagement with the students’ union. The Mary I Students’ Union (MISU) plays a key role in giving students a voice, helping them to use it, and enriching the college experience. The benefits of having an active students’ union are many and varied – MISU gives students a say in their own student/college life, they create a positive college experience for students, help students to integrate into MIC and facilitate extra-curricular activities for students. For many student’s involvement in sport is what makes their college experience. MIC has a proud sporting history with many students, and alumni, making their mark having represented county and country in various sports including GAA, hockey, rugby, athletics, handball, soccer and rowing. Many current and past students are playing at county-level in Gaelic games and individuals are excelling in a number of sports at national and international level including Ciara Griffin (Ireland women’s rugby), Roísín Upton (Ireland women’s hockey) and Amy O ’Donoghue (middle distance runner for Ireland) to name but a few. The MIC senior hurling team have won the Fitzgibbon Cup twice. Indeed, MIC recently introduced Elite Sports Scholarships open to all students who have excelled in their chosen sport. MIC strives to enrich the lives of the students and staff through introducing art into the surroundings, hosting cultural events and fostering an atmosphere where the community can express itself. There are numerous opportunities for students to participate in informal productions and public performances. The College has a particularly active drama society, the MIC Dramatic Arts Society (MIDAS), which celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2019 and the MIC Limerick campus boasts a 510-seat theatre, the Lime Tree Theatre, which plays host to the best in local, national and international performing arts. MIC also boasts a community radio station designed for the third-level students of Limerick. Wired FM, which recently celebrated its 25th Anniversary, is always looking for volunteers who want to try their hand at student broadcasting.  According to Station Manager, Ray Burke, “Wired FM offers so many opportunities for the learning and development of students. Not only do we provide a source of specially tailored programming for student listeners, but the content is produced by students for students. It’s a forum for the cross pollination and exchange of ideas, especially with Wired’s unique set up, where there are multiple colleges and campuses involved in the partnership.” Both the MIC Limerick and MIC Thurles campuses are within walking distance of social and cultural hubs making both campuses great places to live and study and offer students the complete college experience. According to Bachelor of Arts graduate, Tina ODwyer, “Choosing MIC was one of the best decisions I have ever made. MIC is a diverse place where you are constantly given chances to broaden your horizons academically as well as opportunities to grow as a person.” Take the MIC Virtual Tour here.Questions can be submitted during the Live Sessions or in advance to [email protected]  Register for the MIC Student Experience Sessions at www.mic.ie/CAO TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostMICMIC LimerickMIC Student ExperienceMIC Thurles Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Email Previous articleAer Lingus needs to clarify Shannon plans – CroweNext articleLimerick Filmmaker’s Movie in New York Festival Sarah Carrhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Facebooklast_img read more

Watanabe vaults barrier to make gymnastics more enchanting, popular

first_imgAs part of the scheme, five Indonesian male gymnasts will go to Japan in April to train for 10 days. International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) president Morinari Watanabe has vowed to improve the sport’s popularity level. Watanabe, of Japan, who took the helm of the federation in 2016 from Bruno Grandi, is trying to provide access for countries to develop gymnastics through what he calls the Family Strategy. “We didn’t promote [the sport]. We didn’t give a lot of money for the athletes. Now that’s changed. For example, the world championship only provides minor prizes and now we are trying to change that as gymnastics is a major sport,” he said. Ita, meanwhile, said her team planned to organize a festival in each region first before holding the major one in the capital. The sport often struggles to fund training for athletes abroad as its lack of popularity has determined the government’s attention toward it. Indonesia currently only has one single promising talent, Rifda Irfanaluthfi, who competes in artistic gymnastics. Rifda won silver in the floor exercise at the 2018 Asian Games in Jakarta and Palembang, South Sumatra, and brought home one gold and three silver medals from the latest Southeast Asian Games in Philippines last December. Despite its status as the mother of sports, gymnastics is still struggling to gain popularity. The sport, which has introduced stars like Simone Biles and Nastia Liukin to the world, is still finding its place, especially in countries where gymnastics is not well supported. “We have to make it interesting. We must change from [only providing a] sport to also [offering] entertainment. Other sports have done that,” he said. Unlike soccer world governing body FIFA, the FIG does not have a development program that distributes funding for national federations. FIFA, through its FIFA Forward Development Program, provides funding for its members with limited financial capacity as aid that can be used for the federations’ daily operations and to design long-term plans. Watanabe’s seriousness in developing Indonesian gymnastics was also seen from his remark where he wanted to make Indonesia the world training center and that the FIG would donate all the equipment required for the facility. However, he said the plan could only be realized if the government could provide the space for the training center first.center_img In Indonesia, gymnastics has also found a similar struggle as the sport has not met with popular support even though it has the potential to boost the country’s achievements in a multi-sports event. “The international federation cannot support every country in the world. We can say, ‘we will support it,’ but the reality is we can’t,” he told journalists. Therefore, he has developed a strategy to assist the gymnastics community in countries like Indonesia in getting access to better training facilities offered by countries with strong gymnastics traditions. The Family Strategy hailed by Watanabe sees the FIG act like a father with strong gymnastics countries like the United States and China playing the role of older siblings. Indonesia and other countries which are trying to develop the sport are treated like junior siblings. In 2018, the FIG started to move further with its development program by naming a development officer for the African continent with the delegate working “to address Africa’s peculiar challenges and to help accelerate the development of gymnastics in Africa.” During his visit to the Indonesia’s National Olympic Committee (NOC) office in Jakarta last week, Watanabe explained that his federation was currently trying to expand by providing access to developing countries to accelerate their gymnastics development. “Of course the FIG is overseeing these big brothers and sisters but they [are expected] to support the developing countries,” he added. Watanabe expressed an interest in working hand-in-hand with the Indonesian Gymnastics Association (Persani) to develop gymnastics in Indonesia. In a meeting with Persani’s chairman Ita Yuliati, Watanabe said he planned to organize a Gymnastics for Life festival in Jakarta, a one-week festival that aims to promote the sport. NOC Indonesia chief Raja Sapta Oktohari said Watanabe’s visit could be an input to involve gymnastics as part of children’s basic education as the way to promote the sport could be through the inclusion of gymnastics in the curriculum.Topics :last_img read more

New film competition to link arts and sciences

first_imgUSC is launching its first science filmmaking competition today to promote student collaboration across disciplines and to communicate complex science concepts through different means.Clifford Johnson, a professor of physics and astronomy, began developing a plan to hold the competition in 2008 after receiving a National Science Foundation grant. He wants students to develop creative methods for explaining complicated science topics through interdisciplinary collaboration.“The idea was to involve students in making films and training the future scientists, writers, journalists, filmmakers and people from other fields to appreciate how better to communicate science ideas,” he said.The project also aims to give students the opportunity to learn from each other through the process.“Through this competition, people can understand each other’s craft better,” Johnson said.Johnson said there are significant problems with how science is communicated and perceived, and creating films with students from different disciplines can help bridge that gap.“The point is getting people from different departments — whether you’re a film major, science major, English major or business major — to work with each other when they otherwise wouldn’t have,” Johnson said. “It’s all about cross-collaboration, creating more openness in the future and better communication.”Johnson, who has co-written a play about scientists, co-produced educational videos and is currently working on a physics-related graphic novel, said conveying information through different media is an important skill.“The key thing is that the film communicates a science idea, principle or concept, and it can be done in any way that’s a good film,” Johnson said. “It could be a music video, or a standard documentary, a drama, or even an animation.”Film entries will be posted to the competition’s YouTube page and a jury of USC faculty and outside experts will select winners.Teams must include at least one student from a science department, the Viterbi School of Engineering or the Keck School of Medicine, and at least one from the USC School of Cinematic Arts or Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism.Students majoring in science-related fields said they appreciate the chance to share their knowledge. Tammy Bui, a senior majoring in biology, said she thought the program would be very successful.“Many [science students] love nothing more than sharing what we care about to the surrounding community,” Bui said. “This opportunity will not only allow us to do what we are passionate about but it will, more importantly, allow us to bring awareness to others.”Some film students, including Brian Lam, a senior majoring in film production, believe there is  little incentive for film students to participate in the competition because of the specialization of the content.“I personally wouldn’t be interested in a competition like that, because people usually don’t produce films specifically for one festival,” Lam said. “It’s a better investment of time and resources to make a film that can be submitted to multiple festivals or competitions.”Susan Lee, a senior majoring in health promotion and disease prevention studies, said she would feel challenged to find people outside her major.“It makes it much more difficult to find team members outside of one’s immediate major,” Lee said. “However, this could very well be a challenge that encourages some to enter, as they look for opportunities to network with new people.”Prizes for the best three films, including a $2,500 first-place prize, will be funded through the Anton Burg Foundation, named in honor of the founder of the USC chemistry department.“The prize is not as important as exploring and making a film that you would never have made before, and hopefully there will be a lot of films that people will enjoy,” Johnson said. “Reach out, and go outside of your comfort zone. The kinds of friendships you make doing these kinds of collaborative projects last a long time throughout your career.”The deadline for competition registration is Oct. 8 and the final submission deadline is Jan. 11.last_img read more