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In Paris, Muguruza’s 1st Slam title denies Williams her 22nd

first_imgPARIS (AP) — The day before the French Open final, Serena Williams’ coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, was discussing whether his player would need to lift her level to beat Garbine Muguruza and collect a record-equaling 22nd Grand Slam title.“I don’t know why everybody’s so impressed with Garbine,” Mouratoglou said. “Did she win a Slam ever?”His comment, accompanied by a chuckle, was intended in a lighthearted way. About 24 hours later, his question required a new answer.Muguruza won her first major trophy and prevented Williams yet again from collecting No. 22, outplaying the defending champion in a 7-5, 6-4 victory at Roland Garros on Saturday.“She has a bright future, obviously,” said Williams, who at 34 is 12 years older than her Spanish opponent. “She knows how to play on the big stage and … clearly, she knows how to win Grand Slams.”The fourth-seeded Muguruza used her big groundstrokes to keep No. 1 Williams off-balance and overcame signs of nerves in the form of nine double-faults. Most impressively, Muguruza broke Williams four times, including three in a row.“I can’t explain with words what this day means to me,” Muguruza said.This was her second major final; she lost to Williams at Wimbledon last year. But Muguruza has won her past two matches against Williams on the clay of Roland Garros, including in the second round in 2014. So dating to the start of the 2013 French Open, Williams is 0-2 in Paris against Muguruza, 21-0 against everyone else.“I have grown up playing on clay,” Muguruza said during the trophy ceremony, “so for Spain, and for me, this is amazing.”For Williams, whose timing was not exactly right much of the afternoon, Saturday’s loss postponed her pursuit of Steffi Graf’s Open-era mark of 22 major singles championships. Margaret Court holds the all-time record of 24.Spain’s Garbine Muguruza holds the trophy after winning the final of the French Open tennis tournament against Serena Williams of the U.S. in two sets 7-5, 6-4, at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Saturday, June 4, 2016. (AP Photo/David Vincent)Williams got No. 21 at Wimbledon in 2015, her fourth major title in a row. Since, she was beaten in the U.S. Open semifinals by Roberta Vinci, in the Australian Open final by Angelique Kerber, and now by Muguruza. It’s the first time in Williams’ career she lost back-to-back Slam finals.Mouratoglou said Saturday that chasing a 22nd major “isn’t an obsession” for Williams.“She doesn’t wake up every morning thinking about it. That’s for sure.” But he added: “The pressure of leaving an indelible mark on history is incomparable.”Williams credited Muguruza with playing “unbelievable,” adding: “The only thing I can do is just keep trying.”This year’s visit to Paris hardly could have started off more inauspiciously for Muguruza: She lost the first set she played, against 38th-ranked Anna Karolina Schmiedlova.But, oh, how Muguruza turned things around. She won her next 14 sets, displaying take-the-ball-early aggressiveness.The final began under a slate ceiling of clouds, but at least there was none of the heavy rain that led to flooding in Paris and a temporary shutdown of the Louvre museum. The showers jumbled the tournament schedule, and Williams was in action a fourth straight day in the final.She did not blame that or a problem with a leg muscle.“I don’t think it’s like something that I would say: ‘Oh, that was the reason,’” Williams said.Muguruza won the coin toss and let Williams serve first, a fascinating choice given the American’s prowess with that part of the game. And the decision seemed only more dubious as Muguruza put the ball on play on only one of the first six points Williams served.And yet, it all wound up working out. And how.Muguruza won all six points of 10 shots or more in the first set and, indeed, there was no junkballing on this day. Both women hit hard, trading bold forehands and backhands from the baseline that made it seem unfair to characterize nearly anything as an “unforced error.”Williams finished with 39 forced errors, 18 more than Muguruza.After a run of breaks gave Muguruza the first set and a lead in the second, Williams never recovered. She did, however, cast aside a quartet of match points for Muguruza at 5-3. There was nothing Williams could do about the fifth, which Muguruza converted with a delightful lob that landed right on the baseline.Williams applauded. Maybe stunned by that shot, maybe stunned that she was now a Grand Slam champion, Muguruza turned toward her coach and other supporters in the stands with a blank expression. Soon, she was flat on her back, caking her dress and arms with the rust-colored clay she will never forget.“Just goes to show you, you really have to play the big points well,” Williams said, “and I think she played the big points really well.”That’s the sort of thing Williams’ foes usually say. TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

Brian Blessed and Jorja Fox To Host Lion Ark Film Premieres

first_imgLegendary actor Brian Blessed is to host the world premiere of action-documentary Lion Ark, attended by celebrity guests at the Raindance Film Festival on Tuesday, 1 October 2013.Lion Ark is an uplifting story of bravery, compassion, camaraderie and determination, following the world’s most ambitious and daring animal rescue.One of the stars of Lion Ark, The MovieCredit/Copyright: ADI on FlickrFor two years, a team of investigators from Animal Defenders International (ADI) infiltrated the South American circus industry, filming everything they saw. The findings shocked a continent, and Bolivia banned animals in circuses. Most people thought that was it, but almost every circus defied the law – it was business and suffering as usual.So, a year later the same team was back, tracking down the circuses and, in a series of raids, rescuing every animal. The film is the story of how a small group of people came together to secure and then enforce an animal protection law when no one thought it was possible.The rescue was backed by Emmy award-winning TV host Bob Barker and ADI Ambassador and CSI actress Jorja Fox, both of whom appear in the film. Bob Barker’s support enabled the rescue team to empty Bolivia of its suffering circus animals and build homes for them in the US.Celebrities supporting the world premiere in the UK supporting include nutritionist Gillian McKeith, DJ Sarah Young, singer-songwriter Lynsey De Paul, TV host Wendy Turner-Webster and Northern Line’s Dan Corsi.Director Tim Phillips said, “I am overwhelmed by the roaring reviews and celebrity support for Lion Ark. This glamorous world premiere screening is a fitting tribute to the magnificent Lion Ark stars, now living in their Colorado sanctuary.”“I am so pleased to join ADI & support Lion Ark at its world premiere at Raindance Film Festival. Animals don’t belong in the circus!” said DJ Sarah Young.Twiggy said, “The dedication, skill and guts shown by the ADI rescue team in Lion Ark is inspiring.”See more pictures on ADI’s Flickr pageCredit/Copyright: ADI on FlickrIn the US, Jorja Fox will introduce Lion Ark at two screenings during the Mill Valley Film Festival. After the screenings on Saturday October 5th, at 2pm, and Tuesday 8th, at 3pm, the audience will be able to meet and question the rescue team and the production team behind the film.Jorja will also host an After Party on October 5th. This unique event both celebrates the launch of Lion Ark and, also, offers guests early info on the animals ADI want to rescue next! To get your tickets to the party, click here.For more information and to watch the trailer, please visit www.LionArkthemovie.com.Source:Lion Ark, The Movielast_img read more

George Foreman Became Americas Top Pitchman on Advice From

The amazing thing about George Foreman goes beyond winning the heavyweight championship at the creaky boxing age of 45, after losing it at 25 to Muhammad Ali in Zaire, Africa.It’s pretty amazing that all this time later, George Foreman remains relevant. More than that, Foreman, once a boorish and mean oaf, has done so by becoming corporate America’s No. 1 pitchman.It is a position he holds unrivaled, and one no one would have pegged him for after he became this behemoth knockout artist with no room for cheer.But after losing to Jimmy Young in 1977, Foreman said he had a “religious experience.” In that moment in the locker room he decided to retire from boxing and eventually became a born-again Christian.It also was the beginning of him morphing into a Black man who would become the face of white corporate America on a significantly larger scale than O.J. Simpson and even Michael Jordan.Foreman told Sports Illustrated that he mimicked John Wayne when he walked; he adopted mannerisms like boxing champion Sonny Liston; and shaped his mustache after all-time great running back Jim Brown—three men with imposing reputations. He released those elements when he retired.“It took so long for me to find me,” he said to the magazine. “Once I did, my mom even liked me. She didn’t like me much when I was trying to be those other guys.”Ten years after retiring, Foreman, in need of money, returned to boxing with not much fanfare. Promoter Bob Arum recalled to SI: “I was not enthusiastic, realizing what a horrid person he had been.” But after spending an hour with Arum said, “This is the greatest con man in history because he was so different from what he had been before. But it wasn’t a con. He had really changed.”That change made him an embraceable pitchman. It helped that he knocked out Michael Moore at age 45 to become the oldest heavyweight champion in history.Young George Foreman was a force.His always-grinning disposition bordered on buffoonery, but he laced his persona with enough wisdom, gospel and Black empowerment for it to be more congenial than a caricature.Suddenly, with the historic victory and this warm and fuzzy person came offers to endorse products. Foreman told SI he had been hesitant about putting his name to products. But in 1991, none other than Bill Cosby called Foreman.“I don’t want to be on TV saying this and that,” the champ told the comedian.Cosby, Foreman said to the magazine, was not having it. “Come on, man. You’re no different from anyone else. You want to be on television, you want to be known,” Foreman remembers him saying. “If you don’t take ’em, I’ll take ’em.”That was the moment Foreman became the all-time pitchman. Over the years he has done commercials for Nike, Doritos, McDonald’s and Meineke. The deal that made him rich and famous came in ’94, when he agreed to lend his name to and appear in commercials for a line of indoor grills. The George Foreman Grill became a blockbuster hit, earning him more than he ever took as a boxer.He made so much money off the grills that in 1999, Salton Inc., the maker of the product, gave him $137.5 million in combined stock and cash to avoid having to continue paying him royalties, SI reported.He became the spokesperson for InventHelp last year, a company that helps people get patents for prototypes of products. He’s also launching Foreman’s Butcher Shop, a mail-order meat company with an emphasis on quality, health-conscious products sourced from family farms in the Midwest.Why does Foreman push products on all media platforms and speaking?“Never say no,” he said is his approach.He does, however, have other interests. His George Foreman Youth Center in Houston has existed for years as a place Black kids come to play sports and learn life lessons.“The kids would come in and want to learn to box,” Foreman has said. “They wanted to tear up the world, beat up the world. And I’d try to show them they didn’t need anger. They didn’t need all that killing instinct they’d read about. You can be a human being and pursue boxing as a sport.“When you speak to a lot of kids, as I’ve done over the years, you know what to say, keep them laughing, (giving them) good illustrations and (stressing to) learn to read.”Foreman has learned to live with a reality that will not go away, no matter how many products he endorses and how much he’s on TV. At the height of his career, at 40-0 with 37 knockouts, Ali knocked out Foreman in a victory that resounded around the world.“If that fight hadn’t turned out like it did, my life would have been very different,” Foreman said. “I have no regrets. They’ll be talking about it for 100 years, and they’ll always have to mention my name.”He now calls Ali one of his best friends.“After 1981, we became the best of friends,” Foreman said. “By 1984, we loved each other. I’m not closer to anyone else in this life than I am to Muhammad Ali. Why? We were forged by that first fight in Zaire, and our lives are indelibly linked by memories and photographs as young and old men.” read more

17 of staff aged over 55 struggle to manage worklife balance

first_imgJust under a fifth (17%) of respondents aged over 55 struggle to juggle their work with other aspects of their lives, according to research by Robert Half UK.The It’s time we all work happy: the secrets of the happiest companies and employees report, which surveyed 24,000 employees across eight countries, including 2,000 employees from the UK, also found that 12% of respondents aged between 35 and 54 and 10% of millenials struggle to balance their work with other areas of their lives.The research also found:60% of respondents aged between 18 and 35 feel appreciated at work, while 15% of this age group feel undervalued.25% of respondents aged between 35 and 54 feel underappreciated at work, compared to 29% of respondents over the age of 55.34% of respondents aged over 35 found their job stressful, compared to 25% of 18 to 35-year-olds.17% of respondents over the age of 55 are unhappy at work, compared to 16% of respondents aged between 35 and 54, and 8% of respondents between 18 and 34 years-old.Phil Sheridan (pictured), senior managing director at Robert Half UK, said: “Employees that are aged over 35 have valuable experience that the whole organisation can learn and benefit from. It’s important that their happiness is not neglected, so businesses need to take the time to invest in their staff at all levels. Simple things like conducting regular performance reviews, offering new opportunities for learning, and setting ambitious career goals are all steps that can ensure more tenured [employees] feel appreciated and that career goals don’t become static.”last_img read more

Why hide contracts with FB YouTube from us HC asks Centre

first_imgDelhi High Court on Wednesday asked the government why it was “hiding” the contracts it has with social media sites like Facebook and Google and not submitted them despite orders issued five months ago.“Why are you not filing them (contract)? Why are you hiding them from us? Why aren’t you placing it? What is the hesitation? Why aren’t you doing it? It’s been five months since our May 7, 2015 direction,” a bench of justices Badar Durrez Ahmed and Sanjeev Sachdeva said. Also Read – Punjab & Sind Bank cuts MCLR by up to 20 basis pointsOn May 7, the Centre had sought time to place before the court the “exact nature of the contracts which have been entered into by the Government/Government Departments with the social media sites on the internet”.Thereafter on July 30, the government had again sought more time. Today, the bench asked,”What do the contracts say? Because we have a lot to say on that.” In response to the court’s query, the government counsel said the Centre has “standard contracts” with the sites and they are “not tailor-made”. Also Read – ‘The great gold bull market has begun’To this, the bench remarked, “that is exactly what he (petitioner) wants to say”. The court’s direction and observations came while hearing a PIL filed by former BJP leader K N Govindacharya who has raised questions on the usage of social media by government departments.The court, however, directed the Centre to ensure that the contracts it has pertaining to Facebook, YouTube and Whatsapp be filed before the next date of hearing on October 28, so that the matter can be decided finally. Advocate Virag Gupta, appearing for Govindacharya, told the court during the hearing that the “central government has become the biggest marketing agent for social media sites”.Gupta also contended that as per contracts the government has with these companies, it is “transferring/surrendering” all intellectual property rights of the data being uploaded on these sites. The high court on July 30 had asked the Centre to “come out” with details of contracts it has with social media sites to ascertain whether these websites have licences to the intellectual property rights of the contents uploaded.Earlier, the court had observed it appeared that when anything was uploaded on social media sites, the websites got a licence to the intellectual property rights (IPR) of the content without paying any royalty and had asked the Centre whether it was aware of this.last_img read more

How to Build a Mobile App for Your Business

first_img Register Now » This story appears in the October 2011 issue of . Subscribe » October 13, 2011 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 5 min read Mobile applications are no longer an option for small businesses–they’re a necessity. Digital research firm comScore reports that nearly 40 percent of American mobile subscribers accessed downloaded apps in June. And, according to a consumer survey conducted earlier this year by MTV Networks, 91 percent of respondents said apps expose them to new things; 77 percent compared apps to personal assistants; and 83 percent of daily mobile app users reported believing they’re “addicted” to apps.Related: The Best Mobile Apps for BusinessThe fundamental appeal of branded, business-centric mobile applications is clear: Whatever your company does online can also be done on smartphones, which adds portability, location targeting and other cutting-edge technological enhancements to the mix. The potential of mobile apps extends far beyond marketing. Sure, companies can leverage applications to promote their products and services, reaching on-the-go consumers looking for compelling places to shop or grab lunch. But mobile apps can also support online purchase transactions, customer loyalty programs, turn-by-turn directions and social media interactions.Even so, more than three years after Apple first opened its App Store and two years after Google responded with its Android Market, the majority of branded apps available for download promote large, Fortune 500 businesses–not the local restaurants and retailers who stand to benefit most. Chalk that up to cost considerations: Contract app development projects alone can cost anywhere from $3,000 to $8,000, exceeding the budget of the average startup entrepreneur. And that doesn’t even take into account ongoing maintenance and software upgrades.”If you can type in an e-mail address, you can create a mobile app.”– Michael Schneider,Mobile RoadieEnter Mobile Roadie. The Beverly Hills, Calif.-based firm offers an automated turnkey platform that gives its clients the ability to build and manage their own customizable iPhone and Android apps in a matter of minutes. Just upload the desired content and information, and Mobile Roadie handles the rest, including the app store submission process. Best of all, Mobile Roadie pricing begins at $499 for initial setup and $29 per month for ongoing support.Related: Why Mobile-Friendly Websites Are Critical to Your Strategy”If you can type in an e-mail address, you can create a mobile app,” says Mobile Roadie CEO Michael Schneider. “Every brand and business has its superfans–the people who are most loyal to that brand, and who go out of their way to promote it. Mobile apps enable them to promote your brand, share your content on Facebook and Twitter and be a more loyal patron and consumer.”All fledgling businesses should factor mobile apps into their plans from the outset. Creating an app using the Mobile Roadie platform is the easy part. Knowing what you want the app to do–and which consumer segments you wish to reach–can pose a bigger challenge.Here are five lessons all smartphone savants must learn:1. Know what message you want to send. “Before you start working on your app, make sure you know what you’re selling, what you’re about and the look and feel you want, like your logo colors and font,” Schneider says. “You also need to know what content you want to put in. You can integrate your app with your blog or your YouTube channel, but that only works if you have existing content.”2. Understand your audience. “Mobile applications are where people are going to interact with their favorite brands, but you have to know what your customers are interested in,” Schneider says. “Apps allow for new kinds of user experiences and a different community feel than the web, which results in real engagement and commerce opportunities. Fans and users spend more money in apps compared to websites, and they come back more. But you have to drive loyalty, whether that’s by pushing messages or having visual content.”3. Clarify what you want your app to achieve. “Whether or not an app is successful depends on the goal,” Schneider says. “Is it the total number of downloads, or how often people are coming back? How responsive are customers when offers are pushed out? How viral is your content? Or is it how many people are opting in and giving you their e-mail address?”4. Forget about BlackBerry, Win-dows Phone and Palm. As of June, Android controlled 40.1 percent of the U.S. smartphone market, and Apple’s iOS captured 26.6 percent market share. Both are growing each month. Their rivals are fading fast. “iPhone and Android are all that matters. Everything else is irrelevant,” Schneider says. “Entrepreneurs don’t have to think it’s one or the other. With Mobile Roadie, you can do the work once and launch your app on iPhone and Android. It’s not cost-prohibitive, so there’s no reason not to do both.”5. Fasten your seat belt. “Small businesses can really take advantage of the perception that apps are only for large companies,” Schneider says. “Home Depot has an app, but people don’t expect Joe’s Hardware to have an app. It’s an impressive thing for any business to have, like a website was 20 years ago. It sets your company apart, and it puts you on the same playing field as the big boys.” Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more