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Wenatchee Valley College at Omak Celebrating 50 YearsHow To Find The Right

first_imgThere’s a big milestone coming up for Wenatchee Valley College and the city of Omak.“Wenatchee Valley College at Omak is celebrating it’s 50th anniversary with two events on November 30th and they’re both in Hazel Allen Burnett Hall.” explained WVC’s Community Relations Executive Director Libby Siebens, “The first is an open house that’s from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm where folks can come on down to the campus, enjoy tours, and (have) lunch. Then we’ll have a short presentation at noon on the history of the campus and how it came to be.”The second event will be later in the evening from 6-8 pm.Said Siebens, “It’s Native Heritage Month, and there’s an event that’s screening the documentary ‘False Promises: The Lost Land of the Wenatchi’ and that will feature guest speakers from the film and also dinner.”The screening and dinner is sponsored by the Red Road Association and the Wenatchi Advisory Board. Both events are free to the public.The WVC at Omak campus was formed after the College Act passed in 1967. This act required WVC to expand its services to Okanogan County. Since it was founded, WVC at Omak has served nearly 22,000 students in a variety of academic fields.last_img read more

Adolescent drinking linked to changes in metabolite profile

first_img Source:http://www.uef.fi/-/alkoholin-juonti-muuttaa-nuorten-aineenvaihduntaprofiilia Jun 29 2018Adolescent drinking is associated with changes in the metabolite profile, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows. Some of these changes were found to correlate with reduced brain grey matter volume, especially in young women who are heavy drinkers. The findings shed new light on the biological implications of adolescent drinking, and could contribute to the development of new treatments.”For instance, heavy-drinking adolescents showed increased concentrations of 1-methylhistamine, which, in turn, was associated with reduced brain grey matter volume,” Researcher Noora Heikkinen from the University of Eastern Finland explains.Related StoriesNew study explores link between traffic-related air pollution and childhood anxietyMetabolite of kratom alkaloid could be responsible for its pain relief benefitsHesperos’ multi-organ model correctly determine cardiotoxic mechanisms1-methylhistamine is formed in the brain from histamine produced by immune responses.”Our findings suggest that the production of histamine is increased in the brains of heavy-drinking adolescents. This observation can help in the development of methods that make it possible to detect adverse effects caused by alcohol at a very early stage. Possibly, it could also contribute to the development of new treatments to mitigate these adverse effects.”The study was a 10-year follow-up study among adolescents living in eastern Finland. The researchers determined the metabolite profiles of heavy- and light-drinking young adults, and used MRI to measure their brain grey matter volumes. These two methods have not been used in combination before, although previous studies have shown an association between heavy drinking and metabolite profile changes.”What is new and significant about our study is the fact that we observed metabolite profile changes even in young people who consumed alcohol at a level that is socially acceptable. Moreover, none of the study participants had a diagnosis of alcohol dependence.”The findings indicate that even drinking that is not considered excessive has adverse effects on young people, both on their metabolism and brain grey matter volume, on the latter of which the research group has published findings already earlier.”Although adolescent drinking is declining on average, we can see polarization: some adolescents are very heavy drinkers and they also use other substances,” Heikkinen adds.last_img read more

Eating high fiber foods may decrease effects of stress on gut and

first_imgThere is a growing recognition of the role of gut bacteria and the chemicals they make in the regulation of physiology and behavior. The role of short-chain fatty acids in this process is poorly understood up until now. It will be crucial that we look at whether short-chain fatty acids can ameliorate symptoms of stress-related disorders in humans.” Aug 1 2018Eating high fiber foods may reduce the effects of stress on our gut and behavior, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology.Stress is a significant health concern and can cause major changes in the gut and in the brain, which can cause changes in behavior. In recent years there has been growing interest in the link between gut bacteria and stress-related disorders including anxiety, depression and irritable bowel syndrome.Bacteria in the gut produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are the main source of nutrition for cells in this region of the body. Foods such as grains, legumes, and vegetables, contain high levels of fibers and will stimulate the production of these SCFAs.The study conducted by scientists at APC Microbiome Ireland at University College Cork and Teagasc Food Research Centre found that there was decreased levels of stress and anxiety-like behavior when SCFAs were introduced.Related StoriesStress-induced changes in heart rate may impair auditory perceptionStudy reveals how genetic message to produce healthy heart tissue is altered during stress, agingOxidative stress could play key role in the spreading of aberrant proteins in Parkinson’s diseaseMoreover, stress experienced over a prolonged period of time can affect the bowel by making the barrier between the inside of the gut and the rest of the body less effective and “leaky”. This means undigested food particles, bacteria and germs will pass through the leaky gut wall into the blood and cause persistent inflammation. Treating with the SCFAs can also reverse this “leakiness”.These results provide new insights into mechanisms related to the impact of the gut bacteria on the brain and behavior as well as gut health. Developing dietary treatments which target these bacteria will be important for treating stress-related disorders.The study involved feeding mice the main SCFAs normally produced by the gut bacteria and then subjecting them to stress. Using behavioral tests the mice were assessed for anxiety and depressive-like behavior, stress-responsiveness, cognition and sociability as well as how easily material passes through the gut.The exact mechanisms by which SCFAs facilitate their effect remain undetermined. SCFAs had no effect on an increase in body weight caused by stress therefore understanding why SCFAs only affect certain stress-induced effects will be important.Professor John F. Cryan, the corresponding author on the research, commented on the findings: Source: http://www.physoc.orglast_img read more

Etchings on a 500000yearold shell appear to have been made by human

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In 2007, Stephen Munro got the shock of his life. The archaeology graduate student was studying mollusk shells gathered more than 100 years ago on the Indonesian island of Java, where an early human ancestor, Homo erectus, had roamed at least 1 million years ago. As he studied photographs of the shells, Munro spotted one apparently engraved with a pattern of zigzag lines. “I almost fell off my chair,” he says. That’s because the oldest known engravings date back 100,000 years and were made by modern humans—the only species thought to be capable of making abstract designs.Now, after 7 years of work on the shells, Munro and colleagues have confirmed their observations. They also report that one of the shells was used as a tool of some sort, a finding that would expand the known toolmaking capabilities of H. erectus, which was thought to have made only simple tools out of stone.“If correct it certainly pushes back in time the evidence for marking objects in a way that arguably could be considered evidence for symbolic activity,” says Curtis Marean, an archaeologist at Arizona State University, Tempe, who was not involved in the study. But he points out that the Java site, known as Trinil, was excavated in the 1890s using “quite primitive” archaeological methods and that no one has reexamined the location using modern techniques. That means, he says, that “the observation is essentially devoid of context.” Mindful of this kind of criticism, archaeologist and team leader Josephine Joordens of Leiden University in the Netherlands says her group took its time answering a series of questions about how the shell came to be engraved as well as when it might have happened. First, the researchers looked at how the shells accumulated at Trinil in the first place. Munro had focused his research on about 166 specimens of the freshwater mollusk Pseudodon, collected by Dutch paleoanthropologist Eugène Dubois at the site where he found now-famous H. erectus fossils. Studying cigar boxes full of mollusks from the site that are now housed in Leiden, Joordens and other team members found that a third of the shells had holes right where a muscle that keeps the shell closed is found. These holes were apparently made by humans using shark teeth, also found at the site, as tools to open the shells so they could eat them; when team members did their own experiments trying to open shells with sharks’ teeth, they got a very similar pattern of holes.Once they had established that humans gathered the shells, the researchers set about determining whether the engraved shell had been etched deliberately or could have been scratched by rocks in the water or by animal teeth. For those studies, the team brought in Francesco d’Errico, an archaeologist at the University of Bordeaux in France known for his studies of similarly engraved objects in Africa and Europe. Using a microscope, d’Errico was able to demonstrate that the marks had been etched in one session, by one person using a sharp tool; especially revealing were the “turning points” at the ends of the zigzag pattern, which indicated that the engraver had kept the tool firmly on the shell as he or she reversed direction.But could the pattern be a hoax? Robin Dennell, an archaeologist at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom, says he discussed that possibility with the team. “I raised the scenario that one of Dubois’s workforce might have been bored and engraved a shell over lunch time.” But the detailed studies of the engraving, the team reports online today in Nature, revealed that the interiors of the grooves were smooth and rounded, compared with the “jagged and sharp-edged” grooves that team members made themselves on ancient Pseudodon shells. That’s a telltale sign that weathering of the engraving had taken place after the shells were buried in sediments at the Trinil site. Dennell is persuaded. “That part of the analysis is water-tight,” he says.Yet even if ancient humans engraved the shell, says Russell Ciochon, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, the team has not shown that H. erectus did it. Ciochon, who has spent many years working at sites in Java, agrees with criticisms that the shells have been taken out of context, because Trinil was not an occupation site where early humans actually lived. Rather, Ciochon argues, the human fossils found there (which include a skullcap widely agreed to be H. erectus and a thigh bone that could belong to either H. erectus or H. sapiens, a matter of sharp debate) were washed into the site by a powerful flood, and nothing found with them—including the shells—can be assumed to have been associated with them originally. Although the team dated four of the shells in the collection, including the engraved shell, to about 500,000 years ago using two different techniques on sediments of sand and clay found inside them, Ciochon says that those sediments could have entered the shells during the earlier flood event that created the site, and that H. sapiens still could have come along much later and performed the etching.    Then there’s the question of whether the pattern on the shell is truly evidence of rudimentary symbolic behavior. Iain Davidson, an archaeologist at the University of New England in Armidale, Australia, cautions against attaching any meaning to the etchings. According to evolutionary theory, Davidson argues, humans must have been making markings for nonsymbolic reasons—simple doodling, perhaps—before natural selection gave them the cognitive ability to turn those markings into abstract symbols.So far, of course, there is only one example of such a potentially ancient engraving to study. But now that it has been found, Joordens says, she hopes that other researchers will search their own collections for other samples. “One finds what one expects, but we never expected to find this.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emaillast_img read more

Aging space probe records odd emanations on Mercury

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country WASHINGTON, D.C.—In an unusual press conference here today, NASA released a batch of bizarre sound recordings and video from the Messenger spacecraft moments before it impacted the surface of Mercury. Scientists are struggling to decipher what the data mean, but some contend they sound like human voices crying out in agony.Messenger had been orbiting Mercury since 2011, but it used up nearly all of its propellant and was drifting closer to the surface of the planet. So last week, NASA officials decided to point the probe nose downward for a controlled crash. “We were hoping it would kick up some soot for spectroscopic analysis,” says Messenger Principal Investigator Angra Mainyu, a planetary scientist at Columbia University. Just what it did find instead is not entirely clear.At the press conference, Mainyu played grainy recordings of what sounded like anguished voices in various languages. And she showed even grainier images of what appeared to be writhing figures. When asked by a reporter how NASA interpreted the data, Mainyu shrugged her shoulders and said, “How the hell should I know?”center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Reactions to the news were swift and, in some cases, decisive. Welcoming what he called “ineluctable evidence of hell,” Father Felix Flammis, a spokesperson for the Vatican Observatory in Italy, said: “This wonderful discovery shows that science and religion can work together to discover the truth.” But Richard Dawkins, the famed evolutionary biologist and atheist, rejected the finding. “This is clearly a bunch of drivel,” he says. “Wind whistling past the spacecraft, electronic noise—there obviously has to be some other explanation.” Even if the evidence holds up, he quips, “proof of the devil ain’t the same as proof of God.”The findings are somewhat of a surprise, because Venus had long been the leading contender, in our solar system at any rate, for harboring Hades. With a mean surface temperature of 462°C, an oppressive atmosphere, and sulfuric acid rains, it certainly seems to fit biblical descriptions. “Plus, it’s much closer to Earth, so lost souls would be only a hop, skip, and a jump from hell,” says Thor Kölski, an astrophysicist at the University of the Valkyrs in Reykjavik. Kölski has pinpointed the likely epicenter of hell as Venus’s Ganiki Chasma, a rift zone where infrared flashes were first observed last year—phenomena that he asserts are new arrivals to the underworld.Still others think there may be multiple hells within our solar system. “Everything we know about string theory tells us that the ‘Many Hells theory’ isn’t only plausible, it highly likely,” says Franklyn Stein, a theoretical physicist at University College London.Luminaries in the scientific community are by and large embracing the notion of hell. Even Stephen Hawking is on board. The cosmologist stirred controversy in 2010, when he wrote in his book The Grand Design that “[i]t is not necessary to invoke God to light the blue touch paper and set the universe going.” Earlier today, Hawking tweeted: “The devil is a different story. All hail Messenger!”The discovery should provide a major shot in the arm to NASA, whose fortunes in Washington have faded since it retired the space shuttles in 2011. “This is a proud day for the space agency,” says Don Tey, a spokesperson for the Planetary Society in Pasadena, California, who insists that it’s merely a coincidence that the announcement was made on April Fools’ Day. “Congress told NASA to go to hell, and, by Jove, they made it.”last_img read more

Bumble bees being crushed by climate change

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe To see how global climate change is affecting the bees, the researchers amassed a data set consisting of some 423,000 observations, dating back to 1901, of 67 bumble bee species in North America and Europe. Then they mapped large-scale changes in the species’ territories and in their “thermal ranges”—the warmest and coolest places the bees live. They also built statistical models to test whether any range shifts were best explained by climate change, or whether two other factors—changes in land cover and the use of pesticides such as neonicotinoids, which have been implicated in smaller-scale bee declines—also played a key role.Overall, they found that some bumble bees have retreated as many as 300 kilometers from the southern edge of their historic ranges since 1974. The rusty patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis), for instance, has disappeared from parts of the southeastern United States. Southern species are also retreating to higher elevations, shifting upward by an average of about 300 meters over the same time period. Meanwhile, few species have expanded their northern territories. And it turned out that climate change was the only factor that had a meaningful impact on the large-scale range shifts. (Data on pesticide use were available only in the United States, however, and the study did not examine whether populations were growing or shrinking.)One clue to the importance of climate: Bumble bee ranges began shrinking “even before the neonicotinoid pesticides came into play in the 1980s,” says ecologist and coauthor Alana Pindar, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Guelph in Canada. She says the retreat from southern territories is “a huge loss for bumble bee distributions” and happened surprisingly quickly. The researchers believe the retreat—and the move to higher elevations—may reflect the fact that bumble bees evolved in cooler climates than many other insects that haven’t yet lost ground, and so are especially sensitive to warming temperatures.More mysterious is their failure to push north. “What we can infer is that temperature in the northern latitudes is not what’s limiting their spread,” says Ignasi Bartomeus, a researcher at Spain’s Estación Biológica de Doñana in Seville, who was not involved in the study. Differences in daylight or food could hamper a march north, or bumble bee populations may simply be too slow-growing to quickly expand. Many bumble bees form small colonies, Kerr explains, limiting their ability to spread quickly. In contrast, species with high population growth rates are “more likely to be able to establish a new colony that represents a measurable difference in geographic range.” He notes that one outlier in the study, the buff-tailed bumble bee (Bombus terrestris), one of Europe’s most common species, is known for its reproductive success and has moved north. The species “is kind of like the dandelion of the bumble bee world,” he says.So far, says Bartomeus, the most common bumble bee species seem to be the most resilient. But “we have a lot of losers,” he cautions, including species that have specialized habitat requirements. And climate change could further strain species already struggling with dwindling habitat and other pressures, Kerr says. “We’re hitting these animals with everything,” he says. “There’s no way you can nail a bee with neonicotinoids, invasive pathogens, and climate change and come out with a happy bee.”The loss of bee species could carry consequences for ecosystems and people. For instance, “plants that like their pollinators to be pretty loyal” could see declines in reproduction, says ecologist Laura Burkle of Montana State University, Bozeman. And given that wild bees help pollinate many crops, “we play with these things at our peril,” Kerr says. “The human enterprise is the top floor in a really big scaffold. What we’re doing is reaching out and knocking out the supports.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email As the climate changes, plants and animals are on the move. So far, many are redistributing in a similar pattern: As habitat that was once too cold warms up, species are expanding their ranges toward the poles, whereas boundaries closer to the equator have remained more static.Bumble bees, however, appear to be a disturbing exception, according to a study in Science today. A comprehensive look at dozens of species, it finds that many North American and European bumble bees are failing to “track” warming by colonizing new habitats north of their historic range. Simultaneously, they are disappearing from the southern portions of their range.“Climate change is crushing [bumble bee] species in a vice,” says ecologist Jeremy Kerr of the University of Ottawa in Canada, the study’s lead author. The findings underscore the importance of conserving the habitat the insects currently persist in, says Rich Hatfield, a biologist with the Xerces Society for Insect Conservation in Portland, Oregon, who was not involved in the study. Where bumble bees vanish, the wild plants and crops they pollinate could also suffer.last_img read more

Six ways your body changes your perception

first_img*For our full coverage of AAAS 2016, check out our meeting page.Can you jump that gap? Will you even try? Your visual system helps you make such decisions by warping and stretching the things you look at according to your physical traits or abilities, says Jessica Witt, a cognitive psychologist at Colorado State University, Fort Collins. Rather than showing us the world as it is, our vision toys with things like slope and distance. The harder a task, the more it seems to magnify before our eyes. These visual biases may have evolved to help us make quick decisions, letting us know at a glance which tasks to tackle. At the annual meeting of AAAS (which publishes Science) in Washington, D.C., Witt described several ways our physical abilities change what we see.Successful batters see bigger ballsIn a 2005 study, Witt and her colleagues snagged softball players after a game and told them to choose—from several circles printed on a poster—the one that was the same size as a softball. Athletes who had a good night at bat overestimated the size of the ball, whereas those who kept missing underestimated the ball’s size. In a similar experiment, Witt found that golfers who sank more putts judged golf holes as larger.Crappy kicks warp the goalIn the softball experiment, it wasn’t clear whether people really saw things differently or just misremembered them. To find out, Witt turned to field goals in U.S. football, where players must kick a ball over a crossbar that connects two vertical uprights. After several field goal attempts, participants adjusted a small model made of PVC pipe to match the proportions of the goal. People who kicked the ball too low set the model crossbar higher, whereas those who kicked the ball too wide set the model uprights closer together. People could look at the real goal while adjusting the model, so the findings suggest they really saw the goal differently.Parkour athletes see shorter wallsIn parkour—an activity that evolved from obstacle course training—athletes vault, leap, and climb through the urban environment, often launching themselves to the tops of walls. In a 2011 study, Witt and her colleagues asked both parkour experts and novices how well they thought they could climb a given wall and then asked them to estimate its height. Parkour novices saw the walls as taller than they actually were, whereas experienced parkour athletes tended to see walls accurately.“Reaching” tools can make objects look closerEven reaching for the remote control could mess with perceived distances. In a 2005 study, Witt and her colleagues asked participants to estimate the distance to a dot on a table. People consistently underestimated the distance to dots that were close enough for them to reach. They also overestimated the distance to dots that were out of their reach. When participants were given a conductor’s baton, their perceptions shifted again: Dots in reach of the baton appeared closer than they actually were. But this shift only happened if people planned to use the baton; when they just held it, the illusion went away. This suggests that our visual system warps reality to help us plan action.Heavy backpacks make hills look steeperIn a classic earlier study that Witt referenced, researchers asked participants at the base of a hill to estimate the hill’s slope. It looked steeper to people who were tired, elderly, or wearing a heavy backpack. Obese people see things as farther awayBuilding on the backpack study, Witt found that distances look farther to people when they weigh more. She and her colleagues went to a Wal-Mart and asked shoppers to estimate the distance from where they stood to several cones on the ground. Obese participants saw the cones as farther away than people who fell in the “normal” range or were only moderately overweight. The results were dramatic; an extra 200 pounds of body weight roughly doubled peoples’ estimates. Such visual biases could make it harder for obese people to adopt an active lifestyle, according to Witt.last_img read more

Video Air bubbles prove deadly for parched plants

first_imgPlants need carbon dioxide to flourish, but during a drought, gases can leak inside the veins that supply water, cutting off the flow of fluid and killing the plant. In fact, these blockages are the leading cause of death for thirsty plants. But until now, no one has been able to see how the lethal air pockets develop. To watch this process unfold in leaves, researchers took advantage of their natural transparency, using light microscopes to chart the origin and spread of bubbles in several species, including the maidenhair fern (the first leaf in the video, above) and the oak tree (the final leaf). The blockages, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, first crop up in the largest veins. Water circulation slows as existing bubbles spread and new ones start to form, eventually killing the leaf. But not all leaves are equally doomed—some have developed “short cut” veins that, like back roads connecting bigger highways, provide additional outlets for the water. Whereas a few air pockets quickly shut down water flow in simple ferns, plants with more complicated networks of criss-crossing conduits, such as oak and eucalyptus, decline more slowly. Indeed, scientists suspect flowering plants evolved these interconnected plumbing systems in part to protect against the dangers of dry spells.(Video credit: Science/AAAS)last_img read more

Your call and text records are far more revealing than you think

first_imgIn fact, the metadata revealed quite a lot. By using public information and cheap commercial databases to map phone numbers to businesses, organizations, and social media profiles, metadata revealed the location and identity of most of the people, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Even deeply private details such as chronic health problems, religious affiliations, and drug use emerged by simply linking people to various clinics, stores, and organizations through their call records. The sensitivity of phone metadata is “common knowledge in the security and privacy communities,” Mutchler says. The goal of the study was to “put hard data behind these hunches.” The more important revelation, he says, is the shape of a graph that charts phone call networks. In an attempt to limit the scope of phone metadata surveillance, NSA is purportedly following a “two-hop” rule: For any given person of interest, metadata can only be harvested from people called by that person, and then also people called by them. But the study found that a large proportion of their subjects were connected to each other not through personal relationships but through customer service lines, telemarketers, and two-factor authentication services such as those used by Google. Even with a two-hop limitation, an NSA analyst could in principle “hop” to an additional 25,000 people from any one individual. “The existing literature on telephone graph structure hadn’t really mentioned these hubs,” Mutchler says. “Their presence makes some of the legal limitations on the NSA’s access to metadata totally ineffective,” assuming the goal of the two-hop limit is to reduce unnecessary intrusion into people’s private lives.”The study has important implications for surveillance law and policy,” says Arvind Narayanan, a computer scientist and data privacy expert at Princeton University. “Our intuition for terms such as ‘two hops,’ [and how it limits the number of people connected to you], proves wildly inaccurate when applied to modern telephone networks.” And he notes that NSA has vastly more data and resources than academic researchers. “With access to millions of records and sophisticated machine learning techniques, it is likely that one can obtain a far more complete picture of individuals’ sensitive personal details, behavior, and more.” Email Metadata. It’s an obscure data science term that was unknown to most people until 2013, when they learned that the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) is harvesting vast amounts of it from telephone calls. Government officials have downplayed the sensitivity of such data, but a crowdsourced study of phone metadata now finds that highly revealing information can be gleaned from a simple list of who called whom.NSA’s intrusion into citizen’s private lives may have roiled academics, but it has remained unclear what the spy agency was learning from phone metadata. A White House spokesperson reassured the public in 2013 that the metadata harvesting “does not allow the government to listen in on anyone’s telephone calls,” leaving privacy intact. Ever since then, a trio of computer scientists from Stanford University in Palo Alto, California—Jonathan Mayer, Patrick Mutchler, and John Mitchell—has been harvesting phone metadata themselves to see what can be revealed.Unlike NSA, the researchers collected their data with consent from people who downloaded an app called MetaPhone. Once installed on a smart phone, it collects the phone numbers and timing of every call and text message made and received. More than 800 people downloaded the app and consented. If their privacy really is protected, then the records of their 1.2 million text messages and 250,000 calls should reveal little. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Will you wake from a vegetative state New test could tell

first_imgWe still may not know what causes consciousness in humans, but scientists are at least learning how to detect its presence. A new application of a common clinical test, the positron emission tomography (PET) scan, seems to be able to differentiate between minimally conscious brains and those in a vegetative state. The work could help doctors figure out which brain trauma patients are the most likely to recover—and even shed light on the nature of consciousness.“This is really cool what these guys did here,” says neuroscientist Nicholas Schiff at Cornell University, who was not involved in the study. “We’re going to make great use of it.”PET scans work by introducing a small amount of radionuclides into the body. These radioactive compounds act as a tracer and naturally emit subatomic particles called positrons over time, and the gamma rays indirectly produced by this process can be detected by imaging equipment. The most common PET scan uses fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as the tracer in order to show how glucose concentrations change in tissue over time—a proxy for metabolic activity. Compared with other imaging techniques, PET scans are relatively cheap and easy to perform, and are routinely used to survey for cancer, heart problems, and other diseases. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country In the new study, researchers used FDG-PET scans to analyze the resting cerebral metabolic rate—the amount of energy being used by the tissue—of 131 patients with a so-called disorder of consciousness and 28 healthy controls. Disorders of consciousness can refer to a wide range of problems, ranging from a full-blown coma to a minimally conscious state in which patients may experience brief periods where they can communicate and follow instructions. Between these two extremes, patients may be said to be in a vegetative state or exhibit unresponsive wakefulness, characterized by open eyes and basic reflexes, but no signs of awareness. Most disorders of consciousness result from head trauma, and where someone falls on the consciousness continuum is typically determined by the severity of the injury.After the PET scans were complete, the researchers calculated how much glucose was being consumed by the most active hemisphere of the patients’ brains relative to the healthy controls. Patients in a state of unresponsive wakefulness had 38% as much metabolic activity as the controls, minimally conscious patients showed 58% as much activity, and people being roused back to consciousness (either from sleep or anesthesia), had 63% of the normal metabolic activity.The decision to “pull the plug” and remove a loved one from life support is never simple, but the choice could easier if we understood which patients might wake up in time. Although it’s often hard for doctors and family to pinpoint important nuances that separate a lighter state of unconsciousness from a deeper one, the PET scan might help us fill in the gaps.The PET scan data could correctly distinguish between minimal consciousness and severe unresponsive wakefulness with 89% accuracy, the team reports today in Current Biology. The test also seems to predict an individual’s ability to recover from disorders of consciousness: In a 1-year follow up,eight out of 11 patients whose PET scans showed 41% of normal activity or more (between unresponsive wakefulness and minimal consciousness) had regained consciousness, and the PET scan test predicted 88% of all outcomes correctly.A simple test that can be used to distinguish between minimal consciousness and unresponsive wakefulness could be a huge boon to health care practitioners. Schiff says that if we can identify patients who are more likely to make a meaningful recovery, we can do a better job surrounding them with highly skilled workers who can give them the best possible care. “If this bears out, as it appears that it will, nobody should probably leave the hospital with a severe injury and a disorder of consciousness without having this measurement.”In addition to its clinical value, the new study also sheds some light on the nature of consciousness. The predictive power of the PET scan comes from its ability to gauge the brain’s average metabolism. Exactly which regions in the brain are most active does not appear to play a major role in determining a person’s state of consciousness. The researchers suggest that this finding adds to a growing body of evidence that suggests consciousness doesn’t live in any one area of the brain, but is instead an emergent property of many parts working together. Or as Schiff puts it, “Disorders of consciousness are whole brain problems.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Podcast Probing the secrets of the feline mind and how Uber and

first_img Dog cognition and social behavior have hogged the scientific limelight for years—showing in study after study that canines have social skills essential to their relationships with people. Cats, not so much. These often-fractious felines tend to balk at strange situations—be they laboratories, MRI machines, or even a slightly noisy fan. Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss several brave research labs that have started to work with cats on their terms in order to show they have social smarts comparable to dogs. So far, the results suggest that despite their different ancestors and paths to domestication, cats and dogs have a lot more in common then we previously thought.Also this week, host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Greg Erhardt, assistant professor of civil engineering at University of Kentucky in Lexington about the effect of ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft on traffic in San Francisco, California. His group’s work showed that when comparing 2010 and 2016 traffic, these services contributed significantly to increases in congestion in a large growing city like San Francisco, but questions still remain about how much can be generalized to other cities or lower density areas.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download the transcript (PDF) Ads on this show: KiwiCoListen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Thomas Hawk/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] Thomas Hawk/Flickr last_img read more

Citizen sleuths exposed pollution from a centuryold Michigan factory with nationwide implications

first_img Wolverine Worldwide’s Rockford, Michigan, tannery helped produce popular shoes that sometimes included leather waterproofed with problematic nonstick chemicals. Had CCRR not essentially supplied all of the connective tissue … it would have been quite some time before [regulators] put the pieces together. ROCKFORD HISTORIC SOCIETY Environmental Working Group; Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute/Northeastern University, Adapted by N. DESAI/SCIENCE Their plea was rebuffed, so she and a small band of allies launched their own investigation. The group, which ultimately named itself Concerned Citizens for Responsible Remediation (CCRR), collected maps, dug into newspaper archives, and filed requests for public records. Members spoke with scientists knowledgeable about tannery chemicals and hired an environmental attorney with a background in geology to help them strategize. McIntosh even staked out and photographed the demolition of tannery buildings, followed waste trucks to dump sites, and interviewed retired tannery workers. The years of effort yielded stacks of documents that McIntosh—who prefers a simple clamshell cellphone to modern smart screens and paper files to the digital cloud—lugged to meetings in heavy bags.Now, that sleuthing is having far-reaching impacts in Michigan and beyond. The concerned citizens uncovered evidence that the tannery had contaminated large swaths of land and water with chemicals known as a per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), which researchers have linked to an array of human health problems. More than 4000 such compounds exist, and they are widely used in products such as fire-fighting foams, nonstick coatings, carpeting, food packaging, and even dental floss. The tannery used two PFASs by the ton to waterproof shoe leather. In a statement to Science, Wolverine said that when it submitted its application for state redevelopment funds in 2010, it did not know any of the chemicals had leaked. “There was no testing or other environmental data for the former tannery, and no basis to conclude that there was contamination on the property.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Sara TalposMay. 16, 2019 , 2:00 PM After that meeting, Tompkins learned through a public records request that the tannery had once stored Scotchgard and other chemicals in tanks without secondary containment. And after hearing that state officials planned to sample for PFASs at other Michigan sites, CCRR asked whether they could also check the Rogue River. The officials agreed and, in 2015, reported finding elevated levels of PFOS in smallmouth bass and white suckers living downstream of the tannery.”The fish study was seminal for us” because it suggested the tannery had contaminated offsite areas, says A. J. Birkbeck, a Grand Rapids, Michigan–based environmental attorney and hydrogeologist who represents CCRR. The study also gave Rediske the data needed to build a case for action. “I decided I’d really get involved when I got those results,” he recalls. (Wolverine says it is now collecting environmental data at the tannery site and is working on a filtration system to treat groundwater at the site before it reaches the Rogue River.)The group suspected the river wasn’t the only off-site area touched by tannery waste. McIntosh, for instance, had interviewed a former waste hauler named Earl Tefft, who told her that in the 1960s he had spent every day for a year hauling large containers of sludge from the tannery to nearby dump sites. One was on a Wolverine-owned property about 8 kilometers from Rockford on House Street, a woodsy lane dotted with homes that drew their drinking water from private wells. In early 2017, CCRR alerted state officials to the historic dump, fearful that the waste could be contaminating nearby wells.Wolverine tested the wells later that year, and the results were explosive. One water sample had a combined concentration of PFOA and PFOS of 27,600 parts per trillion (ppt), nearly 400 times greater than EPA’s suggested level of concern at the time. It was the highest concentration state toxicologists had ever seen in a well, reported journalist Garret Ellison of the Grand Rapids Press team at MLive, who has extensively covered PFAS contamination in Michigan.The House Street contamination garnered national attention. It appeared to explain why federal officials had found PFAS contamination at a nearby military facility, also on House Street, which had no history of using the chemicals. “Had CCRR not essentially supplied all of the connective tissue … it would have been quite some time before [regulators] put the pieces together” and identified the likely source of the distant pollution, Ellison says.Wolverine declined to comment when asked whether it believes the PFAS contamination in the House Street wells stems from its nearby dump. But the company did outline actions it has taken to ensure safe drinking water for residents. It says it has given water filters to more than 700 homeowners, has sampled more than 1500 residential wells, and is monitoring water contaminant levels at more than 500 homes. REX LARSEN The Wolverine Worldwide tannery, shown here in 1960, was an economic mainstay in the town of Rockford, Michigan. It closed in 2009. Citizen sleuths exposed pollution from a century-old Michigan factory, with nationwide implications CCRR’s work led to the detection of some of the highest levels of PFAS contamination in U.S. drinking water, and the effort helped trigger an unprecedented statewide survey of PFAS contamination in Michigan. The work has led to hundreds of lawsuits against Wolverine and other entities linked to the chemicals. And it has made Michigan a high-profile, closely watched battleground in a rapidly expanding scientific, political, and legal dispute over the threat that PFASs pose to millions of people in the United States.The events in Michigan show “that when you look hard … you’re going to start finding [PFASs] showing up everywhere,” says attorney Erik Olson of the Natural Resources Defense Council in Washington, D.C. Around the country, evidence of PFAS contamination has anxious residents demanding to know how exposure could affect their health. Regulators are struggling to balance cost and risk as they set safety limits. And companies, fire departments, water utilities, and the U.S. military are facing cleanup and liability costs that could total tens of billions of dollars or more.McIntosh and her colleagues—including a toxicologist who works at a nearby university—now find themselves in the public spotlight in ways they never imagined nearly a decade ago. “I had no idea,” McIntosh says, “this would be so big.”An unbreakable bondAt the heart of the PFAS controversy is the carbon-fluorine bond, among the strongest of all chemical bonds. Enzymes can’t break it. Sunlight can’t break it. Water can’t break it. That durability explains the commercial appeal of PFASs, but it makes them problematic pollutants. They’ve been dubbed “forever chemicals” because they don’t degrade naturally. And because the molecules have a water-soluble head, water and airborne droplets can carry them for long distances.The U.S. chemists who discovered how to synthesize PFASs in the 1930s, however, were beguiled by their advantages. Use of the chemicals in the United States began to expand rapidly during the 1950s, when the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, a Saint Paul–based firm now called 3M, began to sell two compounds: perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). PFOA became the basis for Teflon, the ubiquitous nonstick cookware coating manufactured by DuPont. PFOS became a key ingredient in firefighting foams used at airports and military bases and in the popular Scotchgard protectant, which enabled fabrics and other materials to resist water and oils.At Wolverine, Scotchgard played a notable role in the success of one of the company’s iconic shoe lines: Hush Puppies. Thanks to PFASs, the casual pigskin shoes, introduced in the 1950s, were waterproof. They were a best-seller, helping transform Wolverine into a multibillion-dollar company that today holds a portfolio of shoe brands that includes Merrell, Saucony, Stride Rite, and Keds. MLIVE/ADVANCE MEDIA center_img REX LARSEN ROCKFORD, MICHIGAN—For more than a century, a sprawling tannery here on the banks of the Rogue River churned out leather used to make some of the country’s most popular shoes. The factory emitted a putrid stink, but it enabled this city of roughly 6000 people to thrive. “That’s the smell of money,” some locals used to say.In 2009, however, shifts in the shoe trade prompted the tannery’s owner, Wolverine Worldwide, which is based here, to close the facility. In a 2010 request for state funds to help redevelop the 6-hectare site, which sits astride a picturesque business district, lawyers representing the company stated: “There is no known contamination on the property.”Lynn McIntosh, a piano teacher and writer who has lived just a block from the tannery for more than 25 years, was skeptical. The statement was “legalese laced with hogwash,” she recalls thinking when she read it. Tanneries use a stew of hazardous chemicals to transform raw hides into leather, she knew, and sometimes left contamination behind. For that and other reasons, McIntosh and others asked city and state officials to require a comprehensive environmental study of the site before it was redeveloped. States with proposed or existing PFAS limitsContaminated sites Pervasive concerns As testing has revealed more sites with detectable levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in drinking water, groundwater, and the environment, many states have moved to propose or adopt binding limits on PFAS contamination, or to establish nonbinding standards designed to trigger further investigation. A small group of Michigan residents, including (right to left) Lynn McIntosh, A. J. Birkbeck, Janice Tompkins, and Rick Rediske, tracked widespread contamination from a former tannery. Email Garret Ellison, Grand Rapids Press Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Political and economic considerations also are coloring the debate. In general, EPA is not supposed to consider cost in setting pollution limits. But when the agency proposed its 70-ppt advisory level, its own surveys suggested the real-world impact would be minimal because few drinking water supplies were known to have concentrations exceeding that level. Newer surveys suggest many water supplies have some level of PFAS contamination, however, which could create pressure for expensive cleanups if limits are lowered.Industry groups question the need for stricter regulation. In Michigan, for example, Wolverine hired a toxicologist who downplayed the risks associated with PFASs. “Human health effects from exposure … are unknown,” wrote Janet Anderson of Integral Consulting in San Antonio, Texas, in a November 2017 Wolverine blog post. “No human study … has been conducted that proves exposure of an individual to any PFAS … causes any illness.”After the CDC report became public, however, the Trump administration—under growing pressure from Congress and state officials—promised to take action. And in February, EPA released a plan that calls for formally setting regulatory limits for PFOA and PFOS and for launching a nationwide program to monitor PFASs in water systems. The agency said it will beef up research into detection and cleanup methods, consider requiring companies to report PFAS releases, and even consider banning certain compounds.EPA also is planning to intensively examine about 125 of the thousands of newer, less studied PFASs, in collaboration with the National Toxicology Program. One goal is to test the assumption that the newer compounds are safer because they have shorter lives. “We all need to remember that because something doesn’t bioaccumulate doesn’t mean it won’t be a problem if you’re exposed to it, say, in your drinking water every day,” said Linda Birnbaum, director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Durham, North Carolina, at a recent press briefing.In the absence of swift federal action, many states are taking charge. New York has proposed setting a maximum level of 10 ppt for PFOA and PFOS in drinking water, whereas New Jersey is considering slightly higher limits. Vermont lawmakers passed a bill that would set a 20-ppt limit for a combination of five PFASs. Pennsylvania has launched a statewide contamination survey, having already identified more than 300 public water supplies with “an elevated potential for contamination.” And in Michigan, Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D) in March declared that she could “no longer wait for the Trump administration to act” and will propose state drinking water standards for some PFASs.Meeting such new standards could be costly. In New York, officials have estimated that compliance, including equipping water utilities with treatment systems, will cost from $900 million to $1.5 billion. To help defray expenses, some states are suing PFAS polluters. Last year, Minnesota settled a case against 3M for $850 million, which will be used to help provide clean water to affected residents.Official validationHere in Michigan, lawsuits also are underway. More than 200 families living on and near House Street, for instance, are suing Wolverine and 3M. Among the many legal questions is whether the plaintiffs can show they were harmed by exposure to PFAS-contaminated water. If the families win, it could open “the floodgates to more lawsuits and the ability of private citizens and states to sue,” says attorney Paul Albarran of Varnum, the Grand Rapids–based law firm representing the families.In March, state and federal regulators formally validated the sleuthing by McIntosh and CCRR: They officially confirmed that the former tannery site and nearby waste disposal areas are laced with PFASs. The announcement was made at a town hall meeting at Rockford High School. McIntosh and Birkbeck sat in the front row. Rediske, Tompkins, and other CCRR members were also in the crowd. As McIntosh listened, she was struck by how closely the contamination maps that officials presented matched the informal maps she’d drawn based on interviews with former tannery workers.During the meeting, Rediske urged residents to become involved in a new community advisory group that will help oversee the next chapter in the tannery’s history: a long, complex cleanup. Given the role that concerned citizens have already played in resolving past contamination problems in Michigan and beyond, Rediske said he was confident they could also rise to the new challenge: “It can be done.” An angler tries his luck in the Rogue River near the site of a former tannery in Rockford, Michigan. The river’s fish and foam carry chemicals used at the tannery. In November 2017, Michigan officials responded to the results from House Street and elsewhere by launching the most comprehensive statewide survey of PFAS contamination. It analyzed samples from every public water system, as well as groundwater, surface waters, soils, sediments, foam, fish, and other wildlife. The survey showed nearly 1.4 million residents were drinking water from sources contaminated with PFASs. In Parchment, a city in southwestern Michigan, PFAS concentrations in drinking water were so high—1600 ppt—that the governor declared a state of emergency.As public and official concern escalated, Rediske emerged as a go-to expert for journalists and community groups wanting to learn more about PFASs. He was willing to appear on television, Birkbeck says, “and he had the expertise to say, ‘We’ve got a real issue here.’” U.S. Senator Gary Peters (D–MI) even invited Rediske to testify at a public field summit that a committee Peters serves on held in Michigan. Rediske’s testimony, Peters says, “was important [in] assessing what more needs to be done to support local and state efforts” to address PFASs.Michigan wasn’t the only state grappling with the issue. And in Washington, D.C., Congress and newly elected President Donald Trump’s administration were struggling to answer an increasingly urgent question: What is a safe PFAS level, especially in water people drink every day?A push to set limitsSo far, no one is certain. In 2016, after reviewing studies on the possible health impacts of PFASs, EPA lowered its nonbinding advisory standard for drinking water from 400 ppt for PFOA and 200 ppt for PFOS to 70 ppt for both combined. But some researchers and public health advocates argue that level is too lax. Their views got a boost in June 2018, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a long-awaited assessment of 14 PFASs. It recommended “minimal risk” levels for PFOA and PFOS, which the agency later converted to recommendations for drinking water limits. For children, those levels are 21 ppt for PFOA and 14 ppt for PFOS—notably lower than EPA’s advisory level. (Trump administration officials discussed trying to block release of the CDC report, fearing it would create a political firestorm.)CDC’s assessment was based, in part, on prospective studies in which researchers monitored people with known PFAS blood levels to see whether exposure was statistically linked to health issues. In one such study, published in PLOS Medicine in February 2018, higher PFAS levels were associated with greater weight regain among participants in a 2-year weight loss trial. In a second prospective study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives in March 2018, researchers found that women with higher blood levels of PFOS and PFOA were at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes.Researchers don’t fully understand the biological mechanisms that might explain such findings, and that uncertainty has helped fuel debate over safe PFAS limits. At the federal level, for instance, EPA has so far declined to embrace the CDC recommendations. Yet at least one researcher, environmental health specialist Philippe Grandjean of Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, says even CDC’s recommendations are too high. He believes protecting children’s immune systems would require a drinking water limit of just 1 ppt or less. Even as sales of PFOA and PFOS boomed, however, 3M and DuPont researchers were amassing evidence that the chemicals accumulated in people and other animals and could have toxic effects. Much of that evidence became public only because of a lawsuit. In 1980, DuPont purchased farmland in West Virginia and began to dump waste laced with PFOA there. Cattle that grazed nearby began to die, and in 1999 a local family sued the company. The proceeding forced DuPont to hand over internal files, which the family’s attorney, Rob Bilott of Taft Stettinius & Hollister in Cincinnati, Ohio, shared with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 2001, DuPont paid an undisclosed sum to settle the case, and EPA fined the company in 2005 for violating rules for toxic waste. Under pressure from EPA, U.S. manufacturers agreed in 2006 to phase out production of PFOA by 2015. (They ended PFOS production in 2002.) Often, the two chemicals were replaced by related PFASs that manufacturers have asserted are safer and break down faster.Bilott also helped launch a major study of PFASs’ potential health effects. In 2001, he sued DuPont again on behalf of 80,000 people in Ohio and West Virginia served by water sources contaminated with PFOA. In a settlement, DuPont agreed to pay up to $70 million for the study, dubbed the C8 Health Project because PFOA was once called C8 after the molecule’s chain of eight carbon atoms. Beginning in 2005, a team led by a local physician recruited more than 69,000 participants, who answered interview questions, filled out questionnaires, and gave blood samples. In 2011 and 2012, three independent epidemiologists who analyzed the data issued reports indicating a probable link between PFAS exposure and six conditions: high cholesterol, ulcerative colitis, thyroid disease, testicular cancer, kidney cancer, and pregnancy-induced high blood pressure.The C8 study was a gold mine, says Richard DeGrandchamp, a toxicologist at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, who was not involved in the work. “I’m not aware of any major studies in the history of epidemiology and toxicology where we’ve had such a large … group of people who have been exposed.”Meanwhile, other researchers were finding that almost all people living in the United States carry detectable levels of PFASs in their blood (although levels of PFOA and PFOS have declined since they were phased out). And the more researchers looked for PFAS contamination around industrial sites, airports, and military bases, the more they found. But when the concerned citizens began to investigate the tannery here in 2010, they’d never heard of forever chemicals.Revealing testsRick Rediske was hesitant. The environmental chemist had listened intently as two members of CCRR—McIntosh and Janice Tompkins, formerly of Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality—described their investigations into the tannery, just a 30-minute drive from his office at the Allendale campus of Grand Valley State University. “I was impressed with the level of detail they had amassed,” he recalls about the 2012 meeting.The two women offered photographs of hides and leather scraps embedded in the bank of the Rogue River, where their chemical contents could leach into soil and water. The pair also had pictures of potentially contaminated stormwater flowing off the tannery site during demolition and into the river. They shared CCRR’s interviews with former tannery workers about the facility’s use of chemicals and waste disposal practices. McIntosh showed Rediske a map of potential problem areas that she had drawn based on the interviews, including spots where chemicals might have leaked from the tannery through cracked floors and broken pipes. (During her first interview, with a former tannery employee in his 80s, McIntosh learned that Scotchgard had been used to treat the leather.)When the two women asked Rediske whether he could help test for contaminants from the tannery, however, the 66-year-old professor hesitated. He didn’t have funding to conduct such expensive studies. More important, he wasn’t eager to tangle with the law firm representing Wolverine. In the 1990s, after he documented pollution at a Michigan tannery owned by a different company, the same law firm had used public records requests to obtain his emails, technical memos, and laboratory notebooks—and hired consultants to aggressively challenge his findings. His work had withstood the scrutiny and helped state officials win a $3 million cleanup settlement. But the experience was taxing. “Scientists spend their careers building their reputations,” he says. “Providing contrary opinions against powerful business and governmental interests has both monetary and professional costs.” Still, he offered to advise CCRR.last_img read more

25 Photos Of Serena Slaying On Off Court

first_img 18. Girl, you be killin’ em. Source:false I LIVE FOR THIS PASSION #wimbeldon2019 #SerenaWilliams pic.twitter.com/g5v5ww9ywM— Troy (@Troy_Official) July 9, 2019She will now tie Margaret Court’s 24 Grand Slam singles titles records.However, of course some shade is being thrown her way. She is being fined $10,000 for damaging a Wimbledon practice court with her racquet on a June 30 training session, which was the day before tournament started. According to CNN, when reporters asked about the fine, she said, “I haven’t really thought about it, to be honest. I just threw my racquet. I got fined.”When asked to explain how she caused that much damage, she said,  “I mean, I guess if you could tell me, I would appreciate it. I mean, I have always been an Avenger in my heart. Maybe I’m super strong, I don’t know.”Nonetheless, she keeps shining. In early June, she became the first athlete to land a spot on Forbes’ list of the world’s richest self-made women. In addition, the Compton native now has her own Wheaties box; making her the second Black woman tennis player in history to be the face of the cereal brand, the Undefeated reported.She has four Olympic medals and 14 Grand Slam doubles titles under her belt—joins a group of influential Black women athletes who have been featured on the box. Those who have graced the box include tennis player Althea Gibson, track and field star Jackie Joyner-Kersee, and gymnast Dominique Dawes.Williams is not only opening doors for women and girls who want to pursue careers in sports, she’s giving aspiring women entrepreneurs a seat at the venture capital table. In March she joined forces with the app Bumble to invest in women of color entrepreneurs.Check out Serena in all her glory below.25 Photos Of Serena Williams Slaying On And Off The Court was originally published on globalgrind.com 17. Fellas, make sure you don’t drool too much. 3. Serena’s abs have always been on fleek. Source:false 4. Hot mama. Source:false Source:false 9. That Black girl magic just won’t let up. 2. On the cover of a magazine… View this post on Instagram #serenawilliams #goddess A post shared by TeaWithKoko (@teawithkoko) on Jul 9, 2019 at 2:12pm PDT 6. Her backside is one we could peek at all day. Source:false Source:false Source:false 13. Curves on fleek. 5. No need to fix your bikini bottom Serena, you’re flawless. 15. Serena’s got the body of a goddess. 10. If you got a bangin’ bod and you know it, put your hands up. Serena Williams has been the goddess of tennis for years. And today she continued to slay — she has advanced to another Wimbledon Semifinals.See Also: Outrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreShe defeated fellow American Alison Riske 6-4, 4-6, 6-3. See the epic moment below: 21. Serena flaunts her summer body. Source:false 12. Classy as the lady in red. Source:false 19. Clearly, Serena woke up like this. Source:false Source:false Source:false Source:false Source:false 11. Even in a splash of color, we can’t keep our eyes off Serena’s curves. 23. White hot. 24. Check out those killer abs. 20. Flawless. 25. View this post on Instagram “I don’t like to lose — at anything… Yet I’ve grown most not from victories, but setbacks.” – Serena Williams – In what has been a month of incredible sporting performances we can learn much from the athletes who put themselves on the line day after day. – At 64TEQ we take inspiration from our heroes and learn to build on our own resilience so we can perform better and achieve more. – #leadership #gettingthingsdone #lifemotivation #resilience #cybersecurity #believeinyourself #fightformyway #64teq #instapower #serena #serenawilliams #sportquotes #quotes #peopletransformation #sportinghero #tennis A post shared by 64TEQ (@64teq) on Jul 9, 2019 at 12:36pm PDT Source:false 8. Hugging onto her famous cakes. 14. She knows all the right ways to stay slim and trim. Source:false Source:false 16. If anyone’s got a famous donk, it’s definitely Serena. 22. Serena can go from tomboy to lady real quick. 7. Mommy crush everyday. 1. She slays… View this post on Instagram NA SEMIFINAL Com duas horas de jogo, a heptacampeã de Wimbledon Serena Williams superou a compatriota e algoz da número 1 do mundo Alison Riske, com parciais de 6/4, 4/6 e 6/3 e vai à sua 12° semifinal do Grand Slam. Saiba mais em espnW.com.br ou nos stories #TênisNaESPN . #Serena #SerenaWilliams #Wimbledon A post shared by Mundo ESPN (@mundoespn) on Jul 9, 2019 at 7:28am PDT Source:false Source:false Source:false Source:false Source:false last_img read more

Ferral Knight honored for his service

first_imgFerral Knight honored for his service Photo courtesy of Holbrook Unified School DistrictHolbrook Unified School District Governing Board member Ferral Knight received the All-Arizona School Board Award this year. Knight has served as an HUSD No. 3 school board member for 18 years, as a teacher in the Holbrook School District for 29 years for a total of 47 years in education. December 24, 2018center_img RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

Sri Lankan presidential polls to be held between Nov 15 and Dec

first_imgSirisena in October last year sacked Wickremesinghe, who elevated him to the presidency, and replaced him with Rajapaksa. The move led to a constitutional impasse which lasted over 50 days. After the intervention by the Supreme Court court, Wickremesinghe was restored as the prime minister.Sirisena speaking to reporters in New Delhi after attending Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s swearing-in ceremony said he had not decided on seeking another term in the election that is due by year-end.“I am not in a hurry to decide whether to stand,” Sirisena said. Sirisena has faced criticism over his leadership after a series of suicide bombings killed 258 people in the island nation on April 21. Related News Sri Lankan soldier arrested for attack on newspaper editor 10 years ago Deshapriya’s clarification on the constitutional provisions regarding the date for the next presidential elections came after President Maithripala Sirisena told reporters last week in New Delhi that the presidential polls is likely to take place on December 7.President Sirisena’s five-year term is scheduled to end on January 8, 2020.“The election must be held one month before the end of the current president’s term,” Deshapriya said, addressing the Voters’ Day events held at the south Colombo suburb of Moratuwa Saturday. Advertising Sri Lankan presidential polls to be held between Nov 15 and Dec 7: EC President Sirisena’s five-year term is scheduled to end on January 8, 2020. (Photo: Reuters)The presidential elections in Sri Lanka would be held between November 15 and December 7, Election Commission Chairman Mahinda Deshapriya has said, clarifying that according to constitutional provisions the polls must be held one month before the end of the current president’s term. Advertising P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off center_img “The nearest date the election can be held is November 15 as the November 10 is a Sunday and November 12 is a Poya Day (a Buddhist holy day). December 7 is the furthest day the election can be held,” Deshapriya said, adding the Election Commission would be permitted to hold the election on any day between November 15 and December 7.Sirisena was elected for a 5 year-term on January 8, 2015 when he challenged the incumbent Mahinda Rajapaksa. The former strongman had called snap elections two years ahead of the end of his second term.Sirisena backed by the then main Opposition United National Party (UNP) became the common Opposition candidate against his former boss Rajapaksa.Although Sirisena has not so far declared his intention for a re-run, his souring of relationship with the UNP of Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe has indicated that the UNP would be fielding its own candidate. By PTI |Colombo | Published: June 2, 2019 11:51:00 am Sri Lanka to revive suspended visa on arrival programme to 39 countries excluding India Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Post Comment(s) Best Of Express Where India stands in battle against measles, how Sri Lanka eliminated it last_img read more

Mumbai Urmila Matondkars letter hitting out at Sanjay Nirupams aides leaked

first_img Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach She accused Kondvilkar of demanding money from her family members to fund her campaign. He also asked them to talk to Congress’ treasurer Ahmed Patel for release of the funds, she claimed in the letter.Hours after the letter surfaced, Matondkar, who had unsuccessfully contested her maiden Lok Sabha elections from Mumbai North constituency, termed the “leak” unfortunate.“It’s extremely unfortunate that a confidential letter containing privileged communication was made public,” Matondkar said in a statement.Matondkar said she had joined Congress with no personal agenda but to serve the nation. “I had addressed this letter to the Mumbai Congress president with the sole intention to bring about betterment in the party. It is extremely significant to note that this letter was written way before the election results were announced and even before the exit polls,” she said. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Published: July 9, 2019 6:15:12 pm Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising Soon after the letter became public, Nirupam hit out at Deora and accused him of leaking the copies of the letter by Matondkar.“Young leader who desires to stabilise party at the national level has released copies of complaint letter of an LS candidate to media houses to publish it. It was addressed to him against party workers after the election. Is this the way he is going to adopt to stabilise the party,” he tweeted.(With PTI inputs) After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan center_img Top News Best Of Express The letter, dated May 16, was addressed to then Mumbai Congress chief Milind Deora. Deora announced his resignation from the post on Sunday.In the letter, Matondkar had criticised the conduct of Sandesh Kondvilkar and Bhushan Patil, close associates of Nirupam. Matondkar highlighted the failure of the party leadership on coordination at the local level, mobilising workers at grassroots and failure to provide proper resources to her by the two campaign coordinators.She accused Kondvilkar and Patil of showing a “total lack of coordination, honesty and efficiency, ensuring a disastrous outcome” and sought disciplinary action against the duo. Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Advertising Urmila matondkar, Urmila Matondkar letter, urmila letter, urmila letter leak, milind deora, sanjay nirupam, mumbai congress, mumbai congress chief, indian express Matondkar had unsuccessfully contested her maiden Lok Sabha elections from Mumbai North constituency. (File photo)A letter written by actress-turned-politician Urmila Matondkar criticising trusted aides of her senior colleague Sanjay Nirupam that surfaced on Tuesday has triggered a war of words in the state unit of the party. 6 Comment(s)last_img read more

LK Advani attends Dadas first mahayagna in Pune

first_img‘Thus Spake Dada Vaswani,’ and ‘Make the Right Choice’ — two new books and a special edition of East and West Series, a monthly magazine of the Mission, were also released at the event.On July 12 when Dada Vaswani attained “samadhi” last year, prayers were held. A Prabhat Pheri was taken out amidst chants of ‘Hare Ram, Hare Ram, Dada Shyam, Dada Shyam’. “It has been pouring since the last few days and when it did not this morning, I knew it was Dada’s love, yet again, protecting us, shielding us,” said Shobha Budhrani, who had arrived for the Prabhat Pheri from Singapore. “The scene this morning was blessed, I felt so secure and so loved. Every step I took, it felt as though Dada was walking with me. I do not have words to express,” said Neena Daryanani, who had come from Hong Kong.The afternoon session had bhajans, kirtans and sevas. Seva activities were carried out where items were distributed among 19 girl students of St Mira’s, including cash, lunch box, water bottle, pen and pencil.On July 13, akhand kirtans and sevas were conducted in which a month’s ration was distributed to needy families. Artificial limbs were distributed to 33 patients in the Mission, who were a part of the Satara Artificial Limbs Camp. dada jp vaswani, jp vaswani, lk advani, lk advani bjp,bjp leader lk advani, sadhu vaswani mission, former deputy prime minister, advani, india news, Indian Express L K Advani at the Sadhu Vaswani Mission on Saturday. (Express photo)Former Deputy Prime Minister L K Advani Saturday attended the mahayagna held in memory of Dada J P Vaswani at the Sadhu Vaswani Mission on its third day on Saturday. The three-day Mahayagna, the first “in remembrance of the master”, was observed with prayers, sevas and satsangs from July 11 to 13. Related News Who was Dada Vaswani? Advani visits Dada Vaswani ‘His body appeared to be made of rubber, he could mould it as he liked…’ Advertising Advani, who had links with Dada and the Mission, spent at least three hours at the event, sitting silently with folded hands. “On the observance, he chose to remain silent, emphasising that words wouldn’t do justice when encapsulating the memory of Dada,” said a Mission press release. Advani refused to speak to the media.On this observance, Didi Krishna Kumari, sent out a message in remembrance and love, saying, “Today brings with itself boundless blessings. Our thoughts turn to our beloved Dada, just as they do every day, every moment of every day. Exactly one year ago, unfurling his golden wings, he ascended to the Land of Truth. Never could we have thought that our beloved would leave us so swiftly, so suddenly. Day by day, the yearning grows stronger, the longing grows deeper. But nothing, no force can keep Dada away from us. He is not apart from us, he is a part of us.”On July 11, the evening witnessed bhajan renditions by singer Shailendra Bharti. This was followed by a recorded talk of Dada on “overcoming the fear of death”. In it, he spoke of the distinctness between the body and soul. “While the body dies, the soul lives on.” He appealed to all to be fearless in death. Advertising By Express News Service |Pune | Updated: July 14, 2019 7:34:40 am Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Exposure to violence early in life associated with faster biological aging

first_img Source:https://www.elsevier.com/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 1 2018A study in Biological Psychiatry examines the effects of early life adversity on pubertal development and epigenetic ageA study in Biological Psychiatry has shown that exposure to violence early in life—such as physical, emotional, or sexual abuse—is associated with faster biological aging, including pubertal development and a cellular metric of biological aging called epigenetic age. In contrast, children exposed to forms of early life adversity involving deprivation—such as neglect and food insecurity—showed signs of delayed pubertal development compared with their peers.”[The findings] demonstrate that different types of early-life adversity can have different consequences for children’s development,” said senior author Katie McLaughlin, PhD, who completed the study at University of Washington. Poor physical and mental health outcomes associated with early life adversity have been attributed to accelerated development. However, the new findings show that violence- and deprivation-related adversity have different effects on development, indicating that the specific type of adversity should be considered to better understand how an experience will affect a child later in life.Related StoriesNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenResearch team receives federal grant to study obesity in children with spina bifidaRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaIn children who experienced early life violence, accelerated epigenetic aging was associated with increased symptoms of depression. According to the authors, this means that faster biological aging may be one way that early life adversity “gets under the skin” to contribute to later health problems.The 247 children and adolescents involved in the study were 8-16 years old. “These findings indicate that accelerated aging following exposure to violence early in life can already be detected in children as young as 8 years old,” said Dr. McLaughlin.”With each new study, it seems that our appreciation grows of the enormous and persisting impact of early life exposure to violence. This new knowledge calls for increased societal investment in reducing the exposure of children to violence and for biomedical and psychological research to reduce the impact of these experiences throughout the lives of these vulnerable individuals,” said John Krystal, MD, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.Although researchers don’t know if accelerated epigenetic aging is permanent or if it can be reversed, the association between the aging metrics and symptoms of depression in this study may offer a way for doctors to identify children who need help. “Accelerated epigenetic age and pubertal stage could be used to identify youth who are developing faster than expected given their chronological age and who might benefit from intervention. Pubertal stage is an especially useful marker because it is easy and inexpensive to assess by healthcare providers, and could be used to identify youth who may need more intensive health services,” said Dr. McLaughlin.last_img read more

University of Nebraska to develop new drugs that prevent and counteract effects

first_img Source:https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/nebraska-leads-11m-study-to-develop-radiation-exposure-drugs/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 16 2019The U.S. Department of Defense has turned to the University of Nebraska to jumpstart the development of drug therapies to protect military service members from the effects of radiation exposure.In an environment where for-profit pharmaceutical companies are often reluctant to embark upon financially risky drug discovery efforts, the unique four-pronged partnership established by the university and the Department of Defense could shorten the U.S. military’s wait for drugs that prevent and counteract the effects of radiation exposure.”It’s an exciting collaboration among the federal government, our state university and two of its premier research campuses — University of Nebraska Medical Center and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln — and consultants from private pharma who are Nebraska alumni,” said David Berkowitz, professor of chemistry.This team operates under the auspices of the university’s National Strategic Research Institute, one of 13 university-affiliated research centers. Nebraska has the lone research center entrusted by the military to work on chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threats.”This research represents the broad capacity of the University of Nebraska and its alumni consultants to tackle potentially hazardous radiation exposures around the world,” said Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Robert Hinson, founding executive director of the National Strategic Research Initiative.The University of Nebraska project for the Defense Health Agency, and in collaboration with Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, has reached a second increment — potentially awarding nearly $11 million in federal funding over the next five years. Nebraska researchers will look for therapeutics candidates the U.S. military would need to protect troops from radiation in case of exposure, as in a nuclear accident or a nuclear weapons incident.Leveraging the full, collaborative strength of a united university system — multiple campuses, a network of successful alums — directed by the Department of Defense, is something new for the university.”I’ve never been involved with anything like that before,” Berkowitz said. “This team came together as a joint vision between the team leadership and our (Department of Defense) funders and it’s pretty unusual across the country to see such a public-private-government partnership.”In fact, the university hopes this opens the door to continued partnership with private pharma in the longer term, through identifying and developing therapeutic candidates that have dual-purposing potential, Berkowitz said. Berkowitz is co-primary investigator of the project, with Ken Bayles, professor of pathology and microbiology at UNMC.Bayles said if private pharmaceutical companies are leaving a gap, the University of Nebraska is eager to step in.Related StoriesAntibiotic combination effective against drug-resistant PseudomonasComputer-generated flu vaccine enters clinical trials in the USVirus killing protein could be the real antiviral hero finds study”We’ve pitched this concept to develop a virtual pharmaceutical company, a drug development pipeline that would coordinate the activities of all the expertise we have across all of our campuses and develop capabilities to move molecules forward for drug development,” he said.Handfuls of NU’s top scientists will work on medicinal chemistry, metabolomics and bioinformatics in order to move potential drug candidates toward clinical trials. “We’ll be coordinating all of these aspects like a pharmaceutical company does,” Bayles said. “If we do it right, this pipeline concept is an opportunity to build the economy in Nebraska, build the pharmaceutical industry in Nebraska.”Berkowitz said the new multi-pronged, multi-campus team is complex, but, “it’s working pretty well.””We are extremely proud to be affiliated with this research and the impact it can have for the Department of Defense, Defense Health Agency and other agencies as well,” Lt. Gen. Hinson said.Consultants from pharmaceutical industry will advise Nebraska scientists on the drug development effort.Collaborators include the following University of Nebraska scientists, who bring key expertise to the project to establish a drug development pipeline that could speed the process of developing new drugs at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute to counteract the effects of radiation exposure:* Samuel Cohen, UNMC, toxicology. * Patrick Dussault, UNL, synthetic chemistry. * Babu Guda, UNMC, bioinformatics. * Tomas Helikar, UNL, computational systems biology. * DJ Murry, UNMC, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogentics. * Rebecca Oberley-Deegan, UNMC, radiation therapeutics. * Robert Powers, UNL, metabolomics.Additionally, multiple University of Nebraska alums, all doctoral scientists, with current or former experience in private pharma, also are involved. This experienced consultant team includes Eugene Cordes of Philadelphia (honorary degree, UNL, 2009), Norton Peet, Holland, Mich. (Ph.D., UNL, chemistry, 1970), Kevin Woller, Antioch, Ill. (Ph.D., UNL, chemistry , 1996), Chad Briscoe, Overland Park, Kan. (Ph.D., UNL, chemistry, 2009), Ryan Hartung, Tuscon, Ariz. (B.S., UNL, chemistry, 2000).”They are appreciative of the opportunity to give back to their home institution,” said Berkowitz. “They really like the idea of the Lincoln and Omaha campuses collaborating. They really like working for the DoD. There is a patriotic aspect of helping the country and protecting our troops using the tools of biomedical science.”That’s something that has made this project special for all of us.”last_img read more

Early use of norepinephrine could benefit patients with sepsis and low blood

first_img Shock control rate within six hours was significantly higher in the intervention arm: 76.1 percent vs. 48.4 percent. Median time to shock control was significantly shorter in the intervention arm: 4:45 hours vs. 6:02 hours. 28-day mortality was not statistically different between study arms. Lower rates of congestive heart failure and new-onset arrhythmia, two serious adverse events associated with septic shock, among those in the intervention arm. Similar rates of respiratory failure requiring ventilator support and renal failure requiring dialysis between the two groups. Source:http://www.thoracic.org/ The early use of norepinephrine has been advocated in many recommendations, including the Surviving Sepsis Campaign Bundle: 2018. However, firm supporting evidence is lacking; therefore, we conducted a randomized control study to examine the precise benefits of administering norepinephrine at the beginning of sepsis/septic shock resuscitation.”Dr. Permpikul, critical care specialist and chair of medicine at Mahidol University Feb 4 2019Patients with septic shock who were treated with norepinephrine earlier than patients receiving standard care were more likely to have their blood pressure and shock stabilized within six hours of diagnosis, according to a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.Norepinephrine, a naturally occurring stress hormone and neurotransmitter, increases arterial blood pressure through vasoconstriction and is considered the first-line vasopressor for treating septic shock that does not respond adequately to intravenous resuscitation fluids and other measures.In “Early Use of Norepinephrine in Septic Shock Resuscitation (CENSER): A Randomized Trial” Chairat Permpikul, MD, and co-authors report on a study that enrolled 310 adults who received a diagnosis of sepsis with hypotension in the emergency room of Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. Larger studies of norepinephrine focused on the mortality benefit are needed to confirm the current findings. It will also be important to investigate the effect of different doses of the drug before early use of norepinephrine can become a new standard of care.”Surat Tongyoo, MD, study author, cardiologist and critical care specialist at Siriraj Hospital Patients were randomly assigned to receive either early low-dose (0.05 µg/kg/min) norepinephrine or standard treatment. For those in the early intervention arm, the median time from diagnosis to norepinephrine administration was 93 minutes. For those in the standard therapy arm, the median time from diagnosis to norepinephrine administration was 192 minutes.The primary outcome was shock control rate, which was a combination of achieving a mean arterial blood pressure of >65 mmHg and either a small reduction in lactate or adequate urine output, by six hours. A secondary outcomes was 28-day mortality.Related StoriesScientists identify mechanism that makes babies more likely than adults to die from sepsisGenetic variants may be linked with high blood pressure among blacksFirst state-mandated sepsis regulation in the U.S. linked to lower mortality ratesThe study found: The authors noted the concern that early use of norepinephrine could lead to vasoconstriction of abdominal organs leading to splanchnic hypoperfusion. Although the study did not measure splanchnic hypoperfusion directly, the researchers found no difference in the prevalence of organ failure between the two groups.Study limitations include the fact it was conducted at a single hospital, not all patients were treated in the hospital’s ICU and resuscitation fluid rates were not standardized, resulting in variations that may have biased results.For these reasons, the authors wrote that physicians wanting to apply the study results to their own clinical practice “should carefully evaluate the context of this study and compare it with their own situation and setting.”last_img read more